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         Jonson Ben:     more books (100)
  1. Ben Jonson and Theatre: Performance, Practice and Theory
  2. Discoveries and Some Poems by Ben Jonson, 2010-01-08
  3. Ben Jonson's Conversations with Drummond of Hawthornden by Robert F. Patterson, 1982-02
  4. Court Masques: Jacobean and Caroline Entertainments, 1605-1640 (Oxford Drama Library) by George Chapman, Ben Jonson, et all 1995-12-07
  5. Ben Jonson in the Romantic Age by Tom Lockwood, 2005-11-24
  6. The Magnetic Lady: By Ben Jonson (The Revels Plays)
  7. Volpone (Drama Classics) by Ben Jonson, 1996-03-01
  8. Ben Jonson: To the First Folio (British and Irish Authors) by Richard Dutton, 1984-01-27
  9. The Complete Plays of Ben Jonson, Volume 1. Everyman's Library No. 489 by Ben Jonson, 1967
  10. Between Theater and Philosophy: Skepticism in the Major City Comedies of Ben Jonson and Thomas Middleton by Mathew R. Martin, 2001-06
  11. The idea of comedy: essays in prose and verse;: Ben Jonson to George Meredith by William K Wimsatt, 1969
  12. The symbolic persons in the masques of Ben Jonson by Allan H Gilbert, 1965
  13. Ben Jonson: His Life and Work by Rosalind Miles, 1986-11
  14. Plays, viz. I. Volpone: or, the fox. II. The alchemist. III. Epicoene: ... Written by Ben Jonson. by Ben Jonson, 2010-06-10

61. Ben Jonson : Volpone
Brief plot synopsis of each act.
http://hompi.sogang.ac.kr/anthony/Volpone.htm
Ben Jonson : Volpone In his earlier plays, Jonson had made characters speak bitterly, expressing direct and dangerous attacks on the social manners of the higher classes. In Volpone that never happens. The Prologue boasts that it was written in five weeks (Jonson was usually a slow writer), all by Jonson himself. Then the play is compared with the more vulgar kind of play where there is horseplay and clowning: And so presents quick comedy refined,
As best critics have designed;
The laws of time, place, persons he observeth,
From no needful rule he swerveth.
All gall and copperas from his ink he draineth,
Only a little salt remaineth. . . The setting is Venice. Act One begins, as Volpone (the 'fox') and his close servant Mosca (the 'fly') celebrate Volpone's morning 'worship' of his gold: VOLPONE. Good morning to the day; and next, my gold!
Open the shrine, that I may see my saint.
(Mosca opens the curtain that hides much treasure)
Hail the world's soul, and mine! more glad than is
The teeming earth to see the longed-for sun
Peep through the horns of the celestial ram

62. Buy Jonson Ben
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Every man in his humor List Price: Price: You Save:
Description
Renaissance comedy. Complete text, modernized English, critical and explanatory notes and Introduction. From the Yale Ben Jonson edition.
Customer Reviews
Challenging Reading, But Enjoyable - Comes in Two Versions Every Man in His Humor was one of Ben Jonson's earliest plays. Although it is a somewhat obscure work today, remarkably, when first performed in 1598 by the Lord Chamberlain's Men, the cast included Shakespeare, Burbage, and Kemp. The term humor, derived from Latin word for fluid, refers to a Medieval and Renaissance medical theory that a man's health and personality were due to the balance (or imbalance) of four fluids, or humors: blood, phlegm, yellow bile (choler), and black bile (melancholy). The Elizabethan audience would have recognized that Jonson's characters were caricatures of various temperaments and personalities.

63. The Swinburne Project
A study of Ben Jonson comedies, tragedies, masques, miscellaneous works, and discoveries.
http://www.letrs.indiana.edu/cgi-bin/acs-idx.pl?type=fullText&rgn=work&byte=2541

64. [EMLS V.i (May, 1999]: 17.1-7 [Review Of Ben Jonson And Theatre
Matthew Steggle reviews Ben Jonson and Theatre Performance, Practice and Theory, by Richard Cave, et al.
http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/05-1/stegrev.htm
Richard Cave, Elizabeth Schafer, and Brian Woolland, eds. Ben Jonson and Theatre: Performance, Practice and Theory . London: Routledge, 1999. x+223pp. ISBN 415179 81 5.
Matthew Steggle
Sheffield Hallam University
M.Steggle@shu.ac.uk

Steggle, Matthew. "Review of Ben Jonson and Theatre ." Early Modern Literary Studies http://purl.oclc.org/emls/05-1/stegrev.htm
  • Ben Jonson and Theatre is a collection of articles and interviews that grew out of a conference held at Reading University in 1996. Unusually, it combines interviews with actors and directors together with more conventional scholarly papers. The editors are eager to assure us that any appearance of disorganisation is due to "a spirit of a dramatised, Jonsonian discovery" (xiii), rather than anything more chaotic. But does it work, and who would want to read it?
    Clearly, a big concern of this project is to reunite thespians and academics, two groups who generally regard each other with some suspicion. From this point of view, it is slightly odd that the two extended theatrical interviews with Sam Mendes and Genista Macintosh are in a different, rather ritzier typeface from the rest of the book. On second thoughts, this is perhaps as well, as the thespians say some things that would make a zealous professor's heart break for grief for instance, "In terms of the achievement of intention and their stature as living pieces of theatre, they [
  • 65. Ben Jonson — Infoplease.com
    Encyclopedia Jonson, Ben. Jonson, Ben, 1572 – 1637, English dramatist and poet, b. Westminster, London. The highspirited buoyancy of Jonson's plays and the brilliance of his
    http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/people/A0826587.html

    66. [EMLS 1.2 (August 1995): 11.1-6] Review Of Ben Jonson: Poetry And Architecture
    Robert C. Evans reviews Ben Jonson Poetry and Architecture, by A.W. Johnson.
    http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/01-2/rev_rce1.html
    A.W. Johnson. Ben Jonson: Poetry and Architecture . Oxford: Oxford UP, 1994. xviii + 290pp., 26 illustrations, two charts.
    Review by,
    Robert C. Evans
    Auburn University at Montgomery
    bobevans@kaos.aum.edu

    Evans, Robert C. "Review of Ben Jonson: Poetry and Architecture ." Early Modern Literary Studies http://purl.oclc.org/emls/01-2/rev_rce1.html
  • The appearance of Anthony Johnson's book is only the latest indication of a veritable Renaissance in Jonsonian studies during the past decade or so. Indeed, Johnson's is one of a half-dozen academic monographs to appear in the last twelve months, while the recent publication of the inaugural volume of the Ben Jonson Journal and the convening of a major international conference to plan a new standard edition are just two more signs that interest in this poet may be higher now than at any period since his own lifetime. Why this should be so is a fascinating question, but one reason, surely, must be the extraordinary range and complexity of Jonson's life, mind, and art. Anthony Johnson's study of the links between creative writing and architectural design contributes valuably to our understanding of this poet's complexity, and if even half the arguments he proposes seem plausible, we will need to re-think some of our most common assumptions about Jonson's writing and his intellectual and social milieux.
  • 67. [EMLS SI 3 (September, 1998): 8.1-31] "On The Famous Voyage": Ben Jonson And Civ
    Essay by Andrew McRae from Early Modern Literary Studies (September 1998).
    http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/04-2/mcraonth.htm
    "On the Famous Voyage": Ben Jonson and Civic Space
    Andrew McRae
    University of Sydney
    andrew.mcrae@english.usyd.edu.au
    McRae, Andrew. ""On the Famous Voyage": Ben Jonson and Civic Space." Early Modern Literary Studies http://purl.oclc.org/emls/04-2/mcraonth.htm
  • Readers of Ben Jonson have long appreciated the significance of his representations of social space. "To Penshurst" is commonly placed at the forefront of the Jonson canon, seen to typify his preoccupation with the "centred self" of the pre-modern subject, and the location of that subject within a physical and psychological "home." His satiric verse and city comedies have likewise attracted attention, for their disturbing appreciation of the ways in which social and spatial structures in London corrode human values. Jonson's most sustained non-dramatic engagement with his city, however, has received relatively little notice. "On the Famous Voyage," which narrates a journey up the polluted Fleet Ditch from Bridewell to Holborn, is by far the longest poem in Jonson's Epigrammes , and almost twice the length of the famous country-house poem, yet only one critic has considered it worthy of a research article.
  • 68. Ben JOHNSON — Infoplease.com
    History and Government — Congressional Biographies — Kentucky JOHNSON, Ben (1858—1950) JOHNSON, Ben, a Representative from Kentucky; born near Bardstown, Nelson County
    http://www.infoplease.com/biography/us/congress/johnson-ben.html
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    69. [EMLS 6.1 (May, 2000]: 14.1-6 Review Of Lesley Mickel, Ben Jonson's Antimasques
    Matthew Steggle reviews Ben Jonson s Antimasques A history of growth and decline, by Lesley Mickel.
    http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/06-1/stegrev.htm
    Lesley Mickel. Ben Jonson's Antimasques: A history of growth and decline . Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999. 216 pp. ISBN 1 84014 272 3.
    Matthew Steggle
    Sheffield Hallam University
    M.Steggle@shu.ac.uk

    Steggle, Matthew. "Review of Lesley Mickel, Ben Jonson's Antimasques ." Early Modern Literary Studies http://purl.oclc.org/emls/06-1/stegrev.htm
  • This is a chronological study of the rise and fall of the antimasque within Jonson's masques, and it focusses in particular on the form's political content in the more specific sense: its commentary on court intrigue and on royal policy. One of the book's concerns is to situate the antimasque within the wider Jonson canon. Chapter 1 reviews Jonson's poetry, and the ways in which Jonson exploits "the relation between satire and panegyric," relating them to the early masques such as The Masque of Blackness and The Masque of Beauty , which Mickel argues possess in embryo the properties of antimasque. Chapter 2 offers a clear account of the relationships between Arthurian and Augustan in Jonson's chivalric masques, and suggests that the antimasque form developing through these entertainments of 1610-11 should be considered as a relatively close relative of the Roman plays. In the next chapter Mickel considers the antimasques to Hymenaei Love Restored , and Mercury Vindicated from the Alchemists at Court , arguing that all three must be read in strongly topical terms. Chapter 4 relates
  • 70. Jonson, Ben - Astro-Databank, Ben Jonson Horoscope, Born 21 June 1573 (greg.) In
    Astrology data, biography and horoscope chart of Ben Jonson born on 21 June 1573 (greg.) London, England
    http://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Jonson,_Ben
    Jonson, Ben
    From Astro-Databank
    Jump to: navigation search Ben Jonson natal chart (Placidus) natal chart English style (Equal houses) Ben Jonson Name Jonson, Ben Gender : M born on 21 June 1573 (greg.) at 01:30 (= 01:30 AM ) Place London, England, Timezone LMT m0w10 (is local mean time) Data source Conflicting/unverified Rodden Rating DD Astrology data Asc. add Ben Jonson to 'my astro'
    Biography
    British playwright and poet. He was trained as a minister, disliked it and joined the Army. Then entered the theater as an actor and playwright. His literary career began in 1597. Married in 1595, producing three children, none of whom survived him. He died in London 8/06/1637. Link to Wikipedia biography
    Events
    • Work : New Job 1597 (greg.) (His literary career began) Relationship : Marriage 1595 (greg.) Death, Cause unspecified 6 August 1637 (App. age 54)
    Source Notes
    Penfield Collection spec. Old-file has Westminster, England, 2:00 AM. AA Jan. 1971 q. Britannica "born 2 months after his father's death in or near London, probably on June 11, 1573 and most certainly not before Oct. 1572. Kraum in AA March 1971 gives June 11, 1572 OS. spec. 3:16 PM. In a more recent edition of the Britannica it gives a year prior to the former quote, "I or near London, probably June 11, 1572."
    Categories
    • Notable : Book Collection : American Book Vocation : Writers : Playwright/ script Vocation : Writers : Poet Personal : Religion/Spirituality : Western (Trained as a minister, disliked)

    71. EMLS 7.3 ([January, 2002]: 8.1-9 Review Of Ben Jonson, Every Man In And Every Ma
    Matthew Steggle reviews Ben Jonson, Every Man in His Humour and Every Man Out of His Humour, Ed. Helen Ostovich.
    http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/07-3/steg2rev.htm
    Ben Jonson. Every Man In His Humour . Ed. Robert Miola. Manchester: Manchester UP, 2000. xviii+282pp. ISBN 7190 1565 0.
    Ben Jonson. Every Man Out of His Humour . Ed. Helen Ostovich. Manchester: Manchester UP, 2001. xvi+400pp. ISBN 7190 1558 8.
    Matthew Steggle
    Sheffield Hallam University
    M.Steggle@shu.ac.uk

    Steggle, Matthew. "Review of Ben Jonson, Every Man In His Humour and Every Man Out of His Humour ." Early Modern Literary Studies http://purl.oclc.org/emls/07-3/steg2rev.htm
  • Two bold new additions to the Revels series offer a new perspective on the early stages of Jonson's career. Both return to early quartos of the plays in question, bypassing Jonson's magisterialperhaps too magisterial reworkings of them in his 1616 Folio: the plays that emerge are fresh, exuberant, and distinctly unfamiliar. Every Man In stands first in Jonson's notorious Folio Works , although in a heavily adapted form, and it is the Folio version, with its London setting, that went on to have the most influence in the play's subsequent history. It formed the basis for Garrick's successful and long-running adaptation, and has informed most of the criticism of the play. Although both versions have been edited, Herford and Simpson print the Folio version in their seminal twentieth-century edition of Jonson. However, Robert Miola's edition of the play is based on the quarto version set in Florence rather than the later Anglicization. The text is modern-spelling, with in-page apparatus and heavy in-page annotation.
  • 72. Johnson Ben - Email, Address, Phone Numbers, Everything! 123people.com
    Everything you need to know about Johnson Ben Email addresses, Phone numbers, Biography, Lion, Coach, Drama, To Hollywood, Photographer, World record
    http://www.123people.com/s/johnson ben

    73. [EMLS 6.2 (September, 2000]: 4.1-32 Jonson's Romish Foxe
    Alizon Brunning argues that Volpone can also be read as an overtly Anti-Catholic discourse.
    http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/06-2/brunvol.htm
    Jonson's Romish Foxe: Anti-Catholic Discourse in Volpone
    Alizon Brunning
    University of Central Lancashire
    a.j.brunning1@uclan.ac.uk

    Brunning, Alizon. "Jonson's Romish Foxe: Anti-Catholic Discourse in Volpone ." Early Modern Literary Studies http://purl.oclc.org/emls/06-2/brunvol.htm
  • In his Epistle to Volpone Ben Jonson complains about those "that profess to have a key for the deciphering of everything," railing that "[A]pplication is now grown a trade with many." Perhaps Jonson had good reason to protest about "these invading interpreters" as such readings had often led to trouble with authority. The Official papers relating to Jonson's imprisonment for his share in the 1597 lost work The Isle of Dogs reports "Information given upon a lewd play...containing very seditious and scandalous matter". Some years later a letter written to an unknown Lady (probably the Countess of Bedford) by Jonson, again in prison for his part in the 1605 play Eastward Ho , protests that the play is "so mistaken, so misconstrued, so misapplied as I do wonder whether Ignorance, or Impudence be most, who are our adversaries" (H&S I 197).
  • 74. Jack Johnson & Ben Harper – Free Listening, Videos, Concerts, Stats, & Picture
    Top tracks from Jack Johnson Ben Harper My Own Two Hands, High Tide Or Low Tide more. Jack Johnson (born May 18, 1975) (a Hawaiiborn singer-songwriter, accomplished
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    Send Ringtones to Cell Buy Add to my Library Jack Johnson (born May 18, 1975) (a Hawaii-born singer-songwriter, accomplished professional surfer and filmmaker) joins his good friend
    and musical partner Ben Harper (born October 28, 1969)(American singer and songwriter) for some musical collaborations from time to time.
    They made a popular cover of Bob Marley
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    75. [EMLS 1.3 (December 1995): 2.1-25] Marking His Place: Ben Jonson's Punctuation
    Sara van den Berg suggests that to investigate his punctuation is to investigate not only his specific practices but, even more importantly, his theory of the text.
    http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/01-3/bergjons.html
    Marking his Place: Ben Jonson's Punctuation
    Sara van den Berg
    University of Washington
    saravdb@u.washington.edu

    van den Berg, Sara. "Marking his Place: Ben Jonson's Punctuation." Early Modern Literary Studies http://purl.oclc.org/emls/01-3/bergjons.html
  • "Ben:Jonson", perhaps the most distinctive authorial signature in the English Renaissance, is noteworthy for its spelling and, even more, its punctuation. In an era before English spelling and punctuation were normalized, Jonson indulged his own preferences. He dropped the "h" from his surname, thereby making it stand out from the mass of common "Johnsons" and especially from his own family. He inserted a double punctus Und . LXX.84-85). At once appositive and disjunctive, the mark that links "Ben" and "Jonson" is part of his signature, essential to Jonson's act of naming himself. Each name is a kind of sentence, yet the full meaning of his name requires both terms. As Jonson writes in The English Grammar , the colon (which he describes as a "double prick") marks "A Distinction of a Sentence, though perfect in it selfe, yet joyned to another" (HS VIII.552). The mark also identifies Jonson as an adherent of Humanism, eager to introduce into English the new punctuation marks developed by continental Humanist writers, editors and publishers. Among these were the question mark, the exclamation point, and the double
  • 76. Jonson, Ben - Vocabulary Analysis - Times Labs - Book Scraper
    Jonson, Ben. 15721637 , London, England Wikipedia Jonson, Ben. Publications
    http://labs.timesonline.co.uk/bookscraper/authors/jonson-ben

    77. [EMLS 4.3 (January, 1999): 4.1-21] The (Self)-Fashioning Of Ezekiel Edgworth In
    Essay by Jean MacIntyre from Early Modern Literary Studies 43 (January 1999).
    http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/04-3/macijons.html
    The (Self)-Fashioning of Ezekiel Edgworth in Jonson's Bartholomew Fair
    Jean MacIntyre
    University of Alberta
    jean.macintyre@ualberta.ca

    MacIntyre, Jean. " The (Self)-Fashioning of Ezekiel Edgworth in Jonson's Bartholomew Fair Early Modern Literary Studies http://purl.oclc.org/emls/04-3/macijons.html
  • On December 31, 1611, John Chamberlain sent Dudley Carleton, King James's ambassador in Venice, word of an unusual crime: "On Christmas day there was a cutpurse taken in the chappell, even at the Kings elbowe as he was going up to the communion. He was to be tried yesterday and they say shalbe executed at the courtgate" (Chamberlain I, 325). Thanks to the time and place of his crime, and to his impersonation of a gentleman to gain entrance to the royal chapel, the cutpurse, John Selman, became a popular news item. But even before Selman went to the gallows on January 7, 1612, he had become a literary creation in Jonson's Twelfth Night masque Love Restored as "the Christmas Cutpurse," an identity which endured. On the very day he was hanged, an anonymous pamphlet and two extant ballads were registered, and on January 8 and 9 there followed two more ballads now lost. In the autumn Samuel Rowlands published two epigrams about him. Two and a half years later, in Bartholomew Fair , Jonson revived him in a ballad whichWilliam Gilbertson reissued some years later as a broadside with five additional verses.
  • 78. Jonson, Ben
    JONSON, BEN or BENJAMIN (15731637). —Poet and dramatist, was probably b. in Westminster. His f., who d. before Ben was four, seems to have come from Carlisle, and the
    http://www.djmcadam.com/jonson-ben.html
    JONSON, BEN or BENJAMIN (1573-1637). Poet and dramatist, was probably b. in Westminster. His f. , who d. before Ben was four, seems to have come from Carlisle, and the family to have originally belonged to Annandale. He was sent to Westminster School, for which he seems to have been indebted to the kindness of W. Camden ( q.v. ), who was one of the masters. His mother, meanwhile, had m. a bricklayer, and he was for a time put to that trade, but disliking it, he ran away and joined the army, fighting against the Spaniards in the Low Countries. Returning to England about 1592 he took to the stage, both as an actor and as a playwright. In the former capacity he was unsuccessful. In 1598, having killed a fellow-actor in a duel, he was tried for murder, but escaped by benefit of clergy. About the same time he joined the Roman Catholic Church, in which he remained for 12 years. It was in 1598 also that his first successful play, Every Man in his Humour , was produced, with Shakespeare as one of the players.

    79. Cynthia's Revels By Ben Jonson - Project Gutenberg
    Etext at Project Gutenberg.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/3771
    Main Page Mobile Version Search Start Page Offline Catalogs My Bookmarks ... Donate to PG
    Cynthia's Revels by Ben Jonson
    Bibliographic Record
    Author Jonson, Ben, 1573-1637 Title Cynthia's Revels Language English LoC Class PR: Language and Literatures: English literature Subject English drama (Comedy) Subject English drama 17th century Category Text EBook-No. Release Date Feb 1, 2003 Public domain in the USA. Downloads
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    80. The Alchemist By Ben Jonson - Project Gutenberg
    Plain text file at Project Gutenberg.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/4081
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    The Alchemist by Ben Jonson
    Bibliographic Record
    Author Jonson, Ben, 1573-1637 Title The Alchemist Language English LoC Class PR: Language and Literatures: English literature Subject English drama (Comedy) Subject English drama 17th century Category Text EBook-No. Release Date May 1, 2003 Public domain in the USA. Downloads
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