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         Plutarch:     more books (100)
  1. Plutarch's Lives Complete in One Volume (Halcyon Classics) by Plutarch, 2010-07-13
  2. Plutarch's Lives: Part 12 Harvard Classics by Plutarch, 2004-01-11
  3. Plutarch's Morals: ethical essays by Plutarch Plutarch, A R. 1848-1894 Shilleto, 2010-08-17
  4. Greek and Roman Lives (Giant Thrifts) by Plutarch, 2005-10-06
  5. Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans by Donato Acciaiuoli, Simon Goulart, 2010-03-05
  6. Works of Plutarch. Includes The Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans (Parallel Lives), Morals andEssays and Miscellanies (mobi) by Plutarch, 2009-04-02
  7. Essays on Plutarch's Lives
  8. Plutarch: Selected Lives and Essays (Classics Club) by Plutarch, 1951
  9. Plutarch's Practical Ethics: The Social Dynamics of Philosophy by Lieve Van Hoof, 2010-08-13
  10. Essays (Penguin Classics) by Plutarch, 1993-04-06
  11. Plutarch Lives, IX, Demetrius and Antony. Pyrrhus and Gaius Marius (Loeb Classical Library) by Plutarch, 1920-01-01
  12. Plutarch's Lives Volume One (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) (B&N Library of Essential Reading) by Plutarch, 2006-08-17
  13. Our Young Folks' Plutarch by Rosalie Kaufman, 2008-10-15
  14. Moralia (Latin Edition) by Plutarch, 2010-02-04

41. Books
Offers several Stoic classis, including Cicero, Seneca, plutarch, Castoglione, and Erasmus.
http://www.stoics.com/books.html

Home
Why Stoics Books FAQ ... Works Cited Books Cicero's De Officiis
Why Cicero 400 KB
Seneca's Essays Volume I
Why Seneca 400 KB
Seneca's Essays Volume II
Why Seneca 500 KB
Seneca's Essays Volume III
Why Seneca 500 KB
Seneca's Epistles Volume I
Why Seneca 400 KB Seneca's Epistles Volume II Why Seneca 500 KB Seneca's Epistles Volume III Why Seneca 400 KB Plutarch's Lives Volume I Why Plutarch 900 KB Plutarch's Lives Volume II Why Plutarch 1,000 KB Plutarch's Lives Volume III Why Plutarch 600 KB Plutarch's Lives Volume IV Why Plutarch 700 KB Castiglione's Courtier Why Castiglione 900 KB Erasmus's Education of a Christian Prince Why Erasmus Contents, Index and Text 240 KB Elyot's Governour Why Elyot 800 KB Sidney's New Arcadia Book I Why Sidney Text Not Available Spenser's Faerie Queene Books I, II, AND VI Why Spenser 900 KB Montaigne's Essays Volume I Why Montaigne 1000 KB Montaigne's Essays Volume II Why Montaigne 1,400 KB Montaigne's Essays Volume III Why Montaigne 1,400 KB James I's Basilikon Doron Why James I 200 KB Hall's Characters Why Hall Contents, Index and Text

42. AO Plutarch Schedule AmblesideOnline.org
The Ambleside Online curriculum is a free homeschooling curriculum designed to be a modern equivalent to the curriculum that Charlotte Mason (CM) used in her own PNEU schools.
http://www.amblesideonline.org/PlutarchSch.shtml

43. Ancient History Sourcebook: Reports Of The Origins Of Athens, C. 430 BCE - 110 C
Text as written by Herodotus, Thucydides, plutarch, and Aristotle, c. 430 B.C.E - 110 C.E.
http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/athens-origins.html
Back to Ancient History Sourcebook
Ancient History Sourcebook:
Reports of The Origins of Athens, c. 430 BCE - 110 CE
Herodotus
from The History, c. 430 B.C., I.56-59
Thucydides
from The History of the Peloponnesian War , c. 404 B.C., II.5
In the days of Kecrops and the first kings, down to the reign of Theseos, Attica was divided into communes, having their own town halls and magistrates. Except in case of alarm, the whole people did not assemble in council under the king, but administered their own affairs, and advised together in their several townships. Some of them at times even went to war with the king, as the Eleusinians under Eumolpos with King Erectheos. But when Theseos came to the throne, he, being a powerful as well as a wise ruler, among other improvements in the administration of the country, dissolved the councils and separate governments, and united all the inhabitants of Attica in the present city, establishing one council and town hall. They continued to live on their own lands, but he compelled them to resort to Athens as their metropolis i.e.

44. Ploutarchos
Call for papers. IX International Meeting of the IPS (International plutarch Society) Ravello, Villa Rufolo, September 29
http://www.usu.edu/history/ploutarchos/index.htm
Plutarch The International
Plutarch Society Ploutarchos Return to Home Page ips@usu.edu Updated 13 September 2010 Website of The International Plutarch Society Call for papers IX International Meeting of the IPS
(International Plutarch Society) Plutarch's writings: transmission, translation, reception, commentary Organized by Paola Volpe Cacciatore, University of Salerno
c) Methodologies of comment and interpretation of the plutarchean text;
d) Plutarch as reader of ancient texts
Titles and Abstracts (minimum 80 / maximum 350 words), planned for papers that have to take no more than 20 minutes to deliver, should be sent electronically to the official Meeting e-mail address (

45. Theseus - The Athenian Adventurer
Abridged modern English version of plutarch s life of Theseus, the founder of Athens.
http://www.e-classics.com/theseus.htm
T H E S E U S
The Athenian Adventurer
circa 1300 B.C.)
Q H S E U S
by Plutarch
Theseus suppressed crime and brought the natives of Attica together into the first democracy. He saved the Athenian children from the Minotaur, but his kidnap of the queen of the Amazons brought trouble, and he ended his days in disgrace. Go to Home Page for 15 Greek Heroes from Plutarch's Lives As geographers add notes in the margins of their maps, to the effect that regions beyond are dangerous and barren , I might say as well regarding those records available of lives from a past which is more distant than reliable history: only fiction and legends can be found there. Perhaps the purifying process of reason may reduce the following legends into an exact history. However, should they offend by refusing to be reduced to anything like probable fact, I hope that candid readers will indulge these stories of ancient times. Aegeus, the king of Athens, wanted a son to be heir to his kingdom. He went to the oracle at Delphi to ask advice on this matter. The statement of the oracle seemed to indicate that Aegeus should

46. Plutarch (Greek Biographer) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia
plutarch (Greek biographer), ad 46Chaeronea, Boeotia Greeceafter 119biographer and author whose works strongly influenced the evolution of the essay, the biography, and
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/465201/Plutarch
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Table of Contents: Plutarch Article Article Life Life The Lives The Lives The Moralia The Moralia Assessment Assessment Reputation and influence Reputation and influence Additional Reading Additional Reading Related Articles Related Articles Supplemental Information Supplemental Information - Quotations Quotations External Web sites External Web sites Citations Primary Contributor: Frank W. Walbank ARTICLE from the Plutarch Greek Plutarchos

47. The Little Sailing
Ancient Greek texts in Unicode encoding including Aeschylus, Apollodorous, Aristotle, Aristophanes, Euripides, Hesiod, Homer, Lucian, plutarch, Thucydides, and Xenophon. Some texts are with side-by-side translation.
http://www.mikrosapoplous.gr/en/

48. Plutarch | Define Plutarch At Dictionary.com
–noun a.d. c46–c120, Greek biographer.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Plutarch

49. Ancient History Sourcebook: Plutarch: Carneades' Visit To Rome
The Roman historian s account of this Greek philosopher s visit to Rome, during which he argued opposite sides of an argument on successive days, incurring Roman disgust. From the Ancient History Sourcebook.
http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/plut_carneades.html
Back to Ancient History Sourcebook
Ancient History Sourcebook: Plutarch: Carneades Visit to Rome
from Life of Cato the Elder
In 155 BCE, the Athenians sent a delegation to Rome. It included three philosophers, among them Carneades. He was an important member of Plato's school, the Academy, which by this time had become a center of skepticism. Carneades shocked Rome by arguing convincingly for one argument one day, and then refuting all his arguments the following day. Cato the Censor reacted unfavorably - all three philosophers were sent back to Athens. This text is part of the Internet Ancient History Sourcebook . The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts related to medieval and Byzantine history. Paul Halsall May 1998
halsall@murray.fordham.edu

50. Plutarch - Mirror Of Wikipedia - WikiLib.com
plutarch was born in AD 46 in the small town of Chaeronea, in the Greek region known as Boeotia. The name of plutarch's father has not been preserved, but it was probably
http://en.wikilib.com/wiki/Plutarch
Personal tools
Plutarch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation search Categories All articles with unsourced statements ... 127 deaths Plutarch
(Lucius?) Mestrius Plutarchus
Parallel Lives
Amyot translation, Born Circa 46 AD
Chaeronea
Boeotia Died Circa 120 AD
Delphi
Phocis ... Greek Subjects Biography various Literary movement Middle Platonism ...
Hellenistic literature
(Lucius?) Mestrius Plutarchus Greek c. 46 AD 120 AD ), better known in English as Plutarch , was a Greek historian biographer essayist , and Middle Platonist Plutarch was born to a prominent family in Chaeronea Boeotia [Greece], a town about twenty miles east of Delphi . His oeuvre consists of the Parallel Lives and the Moralia
Contents

51. CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Syncretism
An explanation is given by plutarch in a small work on brotherly love ( Opera Moralia , ed. Reiske, VII, 910). He there tells how the Cretans were often engaged in quarrels among themselves, but became immediately reconciled when an external enemy approached.
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14383c.htm
Home Encyclopedia Summa Fathers ... S > Syncretism
Syncretism
From sygkretizein (not from sygkerannynai An explanation is given by Plutarch in a small work on brotherly love ("Opera Moralia", ed. Reiske, VII, 910). He there tells how the Cretans were often engaged in quarrels among themselves, but became immediately reconciled when an external enemy approached. "And that is their so-called Syncretism." In the sixteenth century the term became known through the "Adagia" of Erasmus , and came into use to designate the coherence of dissenters in spite of their difference of opinions, especially with reference to theological divisions. Later, when the term came to be referred to sygkerannynai , it was inaccurately employed to designate the mixture of dissimilar or incompatible things or ideas . This inexact use continues to some extent even today. (1) Syncretism is sometimes used to designate the fusion of pagan religions . In the East the intermixture of the civilizations of different nations began at a very early period. When the East was hellenized under Alexander the Great and the Diadochi in the fourth century B.C.

52. Plutarch - The Greek Historian Plutarch
plutarch is famous for his biographies of lives of famous Greeks and Romans.
http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/plutarch/p/Plutarch.htm
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    Who Was Plutarch?:
    Plutarch is known for writing biographies of famous ancient people Since he lived in the first and second centuries A.D. he had access to material that is no longer available to us which he used to write his biographies. His material is easy to read in translation from the Greek. Shakespeare closely used Plutarch's Life of Anthony for his tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra
    Plutarch (c. A.D. 45-125):
    Plutarch traveled throughout Rome and the Mediterranean, but lived in Boeotia, in the town of Chaeronea, where he was born.
    Family and Life of Plutarch:
    Plutarch's father, a wealthy man, was Aristobulus, also a biographer. Plutarch studied philosophy, rhetoric and mathematics at the Academy in Athens. He was a student of the philosopher Ammonius. Plutarch traveled to Rome where he lectured on philosophy. In his hometown of Chaeronea he was a chief magistrate a director of a philosophical school. From about 95 he was a priest of Delphi.
    Works of Plutarch:
    Plutarch wrote and lectured. Seventy-eight of his pieces are preserved in the "Moralia," but his most famous work is the "Parallel Lives," which compares Greek and Roman statesmen. This work gained the attention of the Emperor Trajan. Even though Plutarch lived hundreds of years after many of his subjects, his information is our best source for many historical figures. This biographical project, he believed, helped him improve morally.

    53. Plutarch - Crystalinks
    plutarch. Mestrius plutarchus (ca. 46 127) was a Greek historian, biographer, and essayist. Born in the small town of Chaeronea, in the Greek region known as Boeotia, probably
    http://www.crystalinks.com/plutarch.html
    Plutarch
    Mestrius Plutarchus (ca. 46- 127) was a Greek historian, biographer, and essayist. Born in the small town of Chaeronea, in the Greek region known as Boeotia, probably during the reign of the Roman Emperor Claudius, Plutarch travelled widely in the Mediterranean world, including twice to Rome. He had a number of influential Roman friends, including Soscius Senecio and Fundanus, both important Senators, to whom some of his later writings were dedicated. He lived most of his life at Chaeronea, and was initiated into the mysteries of the Greek god Apollo. However his duties as the senior of the two priests of Apollo at the Oracle of Delphi (where he was responsible for interpreting the auguries of the Pythia or priestess/oracle) apparently occupied little of his time - he led a most active social and civic life and produced an incredible body of writings, much of which is still extant. Among his approximately 227 works, the most important are the Bioi paralleloi ( Parallel Lives ), in which he recounts the noble deeds and characters of Greek and Roman soldiers, legislators, orators, and statesmen, and the Moralia, or Ethica, a series of more than 60 essays on ethical, religious, physical, political, and literary topics. Life Plutarch was the son of Aristobulus, himself a biographer and philosopher. In 66-67, Plutarch studied mathematics and philosophy at Athens under the philosopher Ammonius. Public duties later took him several times to Rome, where he lectured on philosophy, made many friends, and perhaps enjoyed the acquaintance of the emperors Trajan and Hadrian. According to the Suda lexicon (a Greek dictionary dating c. AD 1000), Trajan bestowed the high rank of an ex-consul upon him. Although this may be true, a report of a 4th-century church historian, Eusebius, that Hadrian made Plutarch governor of Greece is probably apocryphal.

    54. Plutarch • Life Of Antony
    An English translation. All of plutarch's Lives are onsite; in turn part of a very large site on classical Antiquity.
    http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Plutarch/Lives/Antony*.html

    55. Plutarch Quotes
    40 quotes and quotations by plutarch Related Authors Aristotle Socrates Plato Epictetus Epicurus Diogenes Anaxagoras
    http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/p/plutarch.html

    56. Plutarch. A.D. 46?-A.D. C. 120. John Bartlett, Comp. 1919. Familiar Quotations,
    1 As geographers, Sosius, crowd into the edges of their maps parts of the world which they do not know about, adding notes in the margin to the effect that beyond this lies
    http://www.bartleby.com/100/714.html
    Select Search World Factbook Roget's Int'l Thesaurus Bartlett's Quotations Respectfully Quoted Fowler's King's English Strunk's Style Mencken's Language Cambridge History The King James Bible Oxford Shakespeare Gray's Anatomy Farmer's Cookbook Post's Etiquette Bulfinch's Mythology Frazer's Golden Bough All Verse Anthologies Dickinson, E. Eliot, T.S. Frost, R. Hopkins, G.M. Keats, J. Lawrence, D.H. Masters, E.L. Sandburg, C. Sassoon, S. Whitman, W. Wordsworth, W. Yeats, W.B. All Nonfiction Harvard Classics American Essays Einstein's Relativity Grant, U.S. Roosevelt, T. Wells's History Presidential Inaugurals All Fiction Shelf of Fiction Ghost Stories Short Stories Shaw, G.B. Stein, G. Stevenson, R.L. Wells, H.G. Reference Quotations John Bartlett Familiar Quotations ... CONCORDANCE INDEX John Bartlett Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. Plutarch. As geographers, Sosius, crowd into the edges of their maps parts of the world which they do not know about, adding notes in the margin to the effect that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts, and unapproachable bogs. Life of Theseus.

    57. Plutarch (Greek Biographer) :: Reputation And Influence -- Britannica Online Enc
    plutarch (Greek biographer), Reputation and influence, Britannica Online Encyclopedia, plutarch’s later influence has been profound. He was loved and respected in his own
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/465201/Plutarch/5797/Reputation-and-in
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    Table of Contents: Plutarch Article Article Life Life The Lives The Lives The Moralia The Moralia Assessment Assessment Reputation and influence Reputation and influence Additional Reading Additional Reading Related Articles Related Articles Supplemental Information Supplemental Information - Quotations Quotations External Web sites External Web sites Citations
    Reputation and influence
    Lives inspired a rhetorician, Aristides , and a historian, Arrian , to similar comparisons, and a copy accompanied the emperor Marcus Aurelius Proclus Porphyry , and the emperor Julian all quote him, and the Greek

    58. Plutarch: Free Encyclopedia Articles At Questia.com Online Library
    Research plutarch and other related topics by using the free encyclopedia at the Questia.com online library.
    http://www.questia.com/library/encyclopedia/101265146

    59. Plutarch Definition Of Plutarch In The Free Online Encyclopedia.
    plutarch (pl `t rk), A.D. 46?–c.A.D. 120, Greek essayist and biographer, b. Chaeronea, Boeotia. He traveled in Egypt and Italy, visited Rome (where he lectured on philosophy
    http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Plutarch

    60. Plutarch (Biographer) - LoveToKnow 1911
    plutarch (Gr. IIXobrapxos) (c. A.D. 46120), Greek biographer and miscellaneous writer, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia. After having been trained in philosophy at Athens he
    http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Plutarch_(Biographer)
    Plutarch (Biographer)
    From LoveToKnow 1911
    PLUTARCH (Gr. IIXobrapxos) ( c. A.D. 46-120), Greek biographer and miscellaneous writer, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia . After having been trained in philosophy at Athens he travelled and stayed some time at Rome , where he lectured on philosophy and undertook the education of Hadrian Trajan bestowed consular rank upon him, and Hadrian appointed him procurator of Greece . He died in his native town, where he was archon and priest of the Pythian Apollo . In the Consolation to his Wife Dionysus , which held that the soul was imperishable. He seems to have been an independent thinker rather than an adherent of any particular school of philosophy. His vast acquaintance with the literature of his time is everywhere apparent. The celebrity of Plutarch, or at least his popularity, is mainly founded on his forty-six Parallel Lives. He is thought to have written this work in his later years after his return to Chaeronea. His knowledge of Latin and of Roman history he must have partly derived from some years' residence in Rome and other 1 There seems no authority for this statement earlier than the middle ages parts of Italy ,' though he says he was too much engaged in lecturing (doubtless in Greek, on philosophy) to turn his attention much to Roman literature during that period.

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