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         Sallust:     more books (100)
  1. Catiline's War, The Jugurthine War, Histories (Penguin Classics) by Sallust, 2008-02-26
  2. Sallust: Bellum Catilinae (Latin Texts) by P. McGushin, 2010-10-15
  3. The Jugurthine War / The Conspiracy of Catiline (Penguin Classics) by Sallust, 1964-02-28
  4. Sallust by Sallust, 2009-12-27
  5. Catiline's Conspiracy, The Jugurthine War, Histories (Oxford World's Classics) by Sallust, William W. Batstone, 2010-06-06
  6. Catilina; Iugurtha; Historiarum Fragmenta Selecta; Appendix Sallustiana (Oxford Classical Texts) by C. Sallusti Crispi, Sallust, 1991-07-25
  7. A Sallust Reader:Selections from Bellum Catilinae and Bellum Iugurthinum, and Historiae (Latin Readers) by Victoria E Pagán, 2010-04-09
  8. Sallust (Sather Classical Lectures) by Ronald Syme, Ronald Mellor, 2002-06-05
  9. Sallust's Bellum Catilinae (Textbook Series (American Philological Association))
  10. A Systematical Bibliography of Sallust (Mnemosyne , Vol Suppl. 4) by A. D. Leeman, 1997-08
  11. The Gardens of Sallust: A Changing Landscape by Kim J. Hartswick, 2007-01-01
  12. Cicero and Sallust (Latin Readers) by E. J. Barnes, John T. Ramsey, 1988-06
  13. Sallust:Conspiracy of Catiline: A Companion to the Penguin Translation (Classics companions) by P. McGushin, 1987-06
  14. C. Sallusti Crispi Catilina Et Jugurtha: With Explanatory Notes, Lexicon, Etc (Latin Edition) by Sallust, George Stuart, 2010-03-25

1. Sallust - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
Gaius sallustius Crispus, generally known simply as sallust, (8634 BC), a Roman historian, belonged to a well-known plebeian family, and was born at Amiternum in the country of the
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sallust
Sallust
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation search This article is about the historian. For the philosopher, see Sallustius . For other uses, see Sallust (disambiguation) This article relies largely or entirely upon a single source . Please help improve this article by introducing appropriate citations to additional sources. (April 2010) This article includes a list of references , but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations
Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations where appropriate (April 2010) Bust of Sallust Gaius Sallustius Crispus , generally known simply as Sallust , (86-34 BC), a Roman historian, belonged to a well-known plebeian family, and was born at Amiternum in the country of the Sabines . Throughout his career Sallust always stood by his principle as a popularis , an opposer of Pompey 's party and the old aristocracy of Rome.
Contents

2. Elfinspell: Title And Preface, From Sallust, Translation By John. C. Rolfe, Loeb
sallust, C. sallusti Crispi, Title and Preface (86 B.C. c. 34 B.C.) by John C. Rolfe, from the Loeb Library edition, online text, extracts from Maurenbrecher’s edition of the
http://elfinspell.com/SallustTitle.html
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From Sallust [front-
papers]
[i]
THE LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY
EDITED BY
E. CAPPS. P H .D., LL.D. T. E. PAGE, L ITT . D. W. H. D. ROUSE, L ITT .D.
SALLUST
[ii]
[blank]
[iii]
SALLUST
WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION BY
J. C. ROLFE
PROFESSOR OF LATIN IN THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA
LONDON : WILLIAM HEINEMANN
MCMXX
[iv]
PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN v
PREFACE
I N the absence of an entirely satisfactory text of Sallust, the translator has made his own. In some points of orthography, for example in the assimilation of prepositions, he has not followed the manuscripts, but has aimed rather at uniformity. Histories , but the General Editors decided, partly from considerations of space and partly because of the slight interest of the shorter bits, that only the complete Orations and Letters should be printed. To these have been added the Pseudo-Sallustian works mentioned on p. xviii of the Introduction. J OHN C. R OLFE October [vi] [blank]
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3. Guillaume De Salluste Du Bartas - Kalliope
V rker, biografi og samtid.
http://www.kalliope.org/ffront.cgi?fhandle=bartas

4. Sallust: Biography From Answers.com
(born c. 86 BC , Amiternum, Samnium — died 35/34 BC ) Roman historian. sallust probably had military experience before taking political office during the strife of the 50s
http://www.answers.com/topic/sallust

5. Ammianus, Theodosius And Sallust's Jugurtha
ABSTRACT The purpose of this paper is to examine Ammianus' treatment of the elder Theodosius and to suggest the existence of certain parallels between his account of Theodosius
http://www.dur.ac.uk/Classics/histos/1997/seager.html
Ammianus, Theodosius and Sallust's Jugurtha
Robin Seager (University of Liverpool)
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this paper is to examine Ammianus' treatment of the elder Theodosius and to suggest the existence of certain parallels between his account of Theodosius' suppression of the rising of the Moorish chieftain Firmus (29.5) and an earlier North African war, that waged by Q. Metellus and C. Marius against the Numidian king Jugurtha, narrated in Sallust' s monograph. The tentative conclusion will be that a reading of Ammianus that keeps Sallust in mind corroborates a view that is, I believe, defensible in its own right, namely that Ammianus is by no means as uncritical of Theodosius as has sometimes been assumed. Writing under Theodosius' son, he could not of course risk open criticism. Indeed, his portrayal of Theodosius is overtly encomiastic. But, as I have tried to demonstrate elsewhere, Ammianus is capable of subverting even official encomium to produce an effect on his readers very different from that intended by official sources.
1. Theodosius in Britain

6. Sallustius Crispus, Gaius - Catilina
An ongoing project to complete an interlinear Latin translation of sallust s Catilina.
http://www.angelfire.com/az/desertavatar/Cataline/Forward.html
FORWARD
This is a work in progress.....I was fortunate to find an interlinear on this story....dated 1885....in excellent shape, but in need of some revision, mostly for the sake of putting it in HTML format. This work is dedicated to and in the memory of James Hamilton and Thomas Clark, who both did work on this project way back in the 1800's. I have endeavored to put it in a form that makes it easy for someone to get the feel for Latin by reading through this......the division into chapters is my doing; the original is undivided. Keep in mind, this is no first-year Latin.....this is the full language......so if you are new to Latin, do not feel bad about being overwhelmed......it is still possible for you to get a feel for the language by reading through it. As this is a work in progress, it is far from complete at this point....
SALLUSTII CATILINA
Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 ... Chapter 12

7. Sallust Quotes
40 quotes and quotations by sallust Related Authors Herodotus Lord Acton Howard Zinn Michel Foucault Hannah Arendt
http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/s/sallust.html

8. Gaius Sallustius Crispus Bio
Gaius sallustius Crispus. Reprinted in its entirety from Introduction , sallust's Catiline, ed. Jared W. Scudder, Allyn Bacon Boston, 1900.
http://www.uah.edu/student_life/organizations/SAL/texts/bios/gscrispus.html
Gaius Sallustius Crispus
Reprinted in its entirety from "Introduction", Sallust's Catiline
I. Life of Sallust
II. Sallust's Writings
III. Sallust as a Historian
IV. Sallust's Style
LIFE OF SALLUST
Gaius Sallustius Crispus was born in the year B.C. 86, at Amiternum, an ancient Sabine town, situated in the heart of the Apennines, about sixty miles northeast of Rome. Of his early youth we have no definite information. From his writings, however, it is evident that he was a diligent student of both Greek and Latin literature. Indeed, as he tells us in his introduction to the Bellum Catilinae, he was at first inclined to devote his life to historical studies. But at that time there was very little encouragement to enter the field of literature; and Sallust, like most young Romans of ability, was drawn into the whirl of politics. As he was a plebeian by birth, he naturally identified himself with the people's party, and always remained a consistent democrat.
horti Sallustiani ) near the porta Salaria on the Quirinal hill, where he also built a palatial residence for himself.

9. Alle Biographien Auf Einen Blick
Die Sammlung h lt unter anderem Lebensl ufe von Augustus, Caesar, Cicero, Tiberius, Domitian, sallust, Titus, Trajan und Vespasian bereit.
http://www.romanum.de/romanum/data/biographien/allebios.html
updateEnvironment(1, 9, 26);
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    10. Sallust (Roman Historian) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia
    sallust (Roman historian), c. 86 bcAmiternum, Samnium now San Vittorino, near L’Aquila, Italy 35/34 bcRoman historian and one of the great Latin literary stylists, noted
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/519466/Sallust
    document.write(''); Search Site: With all of these words With the exact phrase With any of these words Without these words Home CREATE MY Sallust NEW ARTICLE ... SAVE
    Sallust
    Table of Contents: Sallust Article Article Additional Reading Additional Reading Related Articles Related Articles Citations ARTICLE from the Sallust Latin in full Gaius Sallustius Crispus (b. c. bc bc ), Roman historian and one of the great Latin literary stylists, noted for his narrative writings dealing with political personalities, corruption, and party rivalry. Sabine and probably belonged to the local aristocracy, but he was the only member known to have served in the Roman Senate. Thus, he embarked on a political career as a novus homo bc . His first political office Because of electoral disturbances in 53, there were no regular government officials other than the tribunes, and the next year opened in violence that led to the murder of

    11. Translation Of Sallust's Catilinarian War - Bellum Catilinae 2
    XXI. XXI. postquam accep re ea homines, quibus mala abunde omnia erant, sed neque res neque spes bona ulla, tametsi illis quieta mouere magna merces uidebatur, tamen
    http://www.slu.edu/colleges/AS/languages/classical/latin/tchmat/readers/accreade
    Sallust's Catilinarian War
    Bicolumnar Bilingual Format
    Acceleration Reader Index
    Bellum I-XX *Bellum XXI-XL Bellum XLI-LXI ... PDF File
    XXI XXI After the men heard this, being overwhelmed with all sorts of troubles, utterly lacking in financial resources and any hope at all, even though merely disturbing the peace seemed to them to be ample reward enough, quite a few of them still asked him to explain the terms of the war, what rewards they would be aiming to get by fighting, and what support they had or what could they count on from any quarter. tum Catilina polliceri tabulas nouas, proscriptionem locupletium, magistratus, sacerdotia, rapinas, alia omnia, quae bellum atque libido uictorum fert; praeterea esse in Hispania citeriore Pisonem, in Mauretania cum exercitu P.~Sittium Nucerinum, consili sui participes; petere consulatum C.~Antonium, quem sibi collegam fore speraret, hominem et familiarem et omnibus necessitudinibus circumuentum; cum eo se consulem initium agendi facturum. Then Catiline promised the clearing of all debts, the proscription of the wealthy, offices, priesthoods, looting, and everything else that war or the pleasure of the winners entails. In addition, Piso was in Nearer Spain, Publius Sittius Nucerinus was in Mauretania with an army, and these were in on the plot. Gaius Antonius was seeking the consulship. Catiline expected that he would share it with him, being a man both a close friend and plagued by all kinds of urgent needs. He as consul would start the action with him.

    12. RETIARIVS - Ressources Pour Le Latin : Accueil
    Recensement des ressources disponibles sur le web, francophone essentiellement, relatives au latin programmes officiels, annales, r pertoire g n ral de liens, dossiers th matiques, synth ses par auteur, recension des traductions disponibles. Moteurs de recherche de textes latins et de grammaire latine. Publications hypertextes Tite-Live, Aulu-Gelle, salluste.
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    13. Sallust - Roman Politician And Historian Sallust
    sallust was a a Roman politician and historian. sallust is considered a great literary stylist and the first Roman historian.
    http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/sallust/p/Sallust.htm
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    Sallust's Role in History:
    Sallust is considered a great literary stylist and the first Roman historian. Earlier, there had been Roman annalist . His model was Thucydides, according to J.W. Mackail
    Sallust's Birth:
    Gaius Sallustius Crispus (Sallust) was born c. 86 B.C. to a plebeian Sabine family, at Amiternum (now San Vittorino, Italy).
    Sallust and Cicero:
    When Milo and his followers killed Claudius Pulcher (both Milo and Claudius are sometimes described as thugs), Cicero defended Milo. Sallust stood on the other side in the division of the senators.
    The Writings of Sallust:
    Sallust's first monograph was his Bellum Catilinae (43-42 B.C.) about the conspiracy of Catiline. Sallust's second monograph was the

    14. Sallust's Bellum Catilinae
    sallust's Bellum Catilinae A New English Translation with text, translation, and commentary by E.H. Campbell sallust's Bellum Catilinae
    http://www.indybay.org/uploads/2008/05/13/bellum.catilinae.13may08.pdf

    15. Sallust: Conspiracy Of Catiline
    Gaius sallustius Crispus Conspiracy of Catiline. literally translated by the Rev. John Selby Watson. New York Harper Brothers, 329 331 Pearl Street (1867).
    http://www.forumromanum.org/literature/sallust/catilinae.html
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    (single page) Help Secondary Texts What's New Credits ... Gaius Sallustius Crispus Conspiracy of Catiline. literally translated by the Rev. John Selby Watson. THE ARGUMENT. THE INTRODUCTION, I.-IV. V. VI.-IX. X.-XIII. ... LXI. It becomes all men, who desire to excel other animals, to strive, to the utmost of their power, not to pass through life in obscurity, like the beasts of the field, which nature has formed groveling and subservient to appetite. All our power is situate in the mind and in the body. Of the mind we rather employ the government; of the body, the service. The one is common to us with the gods; the other with the brutes. It appears to me, therefore, more reasonable to pursue glory by means of the intellect than of bodily strength, and, since the life which we enjoy is short, to make the remembrance of us as lasting as possible. For the glory of wealth and beauty is fleeting and perishable; that of intellectual power is illustrious and immortal. Yet it was long a subject of dispute among mankind, whether military efforts were more advanced by strength of body, or by force of intellect. For, in affairs of war, it is necessary to plan before beginning to act, and, after planning, to act with promptitude and vigor. Thus, each being insufficient of itself, the one requires the assistance of the other.

    16. Creative Quotations From Sallust (86BC-34BC)
    sallust in quotations to inspire creative thinking The fame that goes with wealth and beauty is fleeting and fragile; intellectual superiority is a possession glorious and eternal.
    http://creativequotations.com/one/744.htm
    Home Search Indexes E-books ... creative
    Creative Quotations from . . . Sallust
    (86BC-34BC) born on Roman historian. Share The fame that goes with wealth and beauty is fleeting and fragile; intellectual superiority is a possession glorious and eternal.
    No mortal man has ever served at the same time his passions and his best interests. Every bad precedent originated as a justifiable measure. No man underestimates the wrongs he suffers; many take them more seriously than is right. "It is the nature of ambition to make men liars and cheats, to hide the truth in their breasts, and show, like jugglers, another thing in their mouths."
    Published Sources for the above Quotations:
    F: "In "The Speaker's Electronic Reference Collection," AApex Software, 1994." R: "In "The Speaker's Electronic Reference Collection," AApex Software, 1994." A: "In "The Speaker's Electronic Reference Collection," AApex Software, 1994." N: "In "The Speaker's Electronic Reference Collection," AApex Software, 1994." K: "In "Poor Man's College Quotations Collection," ed. Sidney Madwed, AAPEX software, 1994."

    17. Sallust - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
    Life and career. After an illspent youth, sallust entered public life and won election as Quaestor in 55 and one of the tribunes of the people in 52, the year in which the
    http://danpritchard.com/wiki/Sallust
    Sallust edit
    extracted from Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia (using Wikipedia Reflection Script
    Sallust
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation search This article is about the historian. For the philosopher, see Sallustius . For other uses, see Sallust (disambiguation) This article relies largely or entirely upon a single source . Please help improve this article by introducing appropriate citations to additional sources. (April 2010) This article includes a list of references , but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations
    Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations where appropriate (April 2010) Bust of Sallust Gaius Sallustius Crispus , generally known simply as Sallust , (86-34 BC), a Roman historian, belonged to a well-known plebeian family, and was born at Amiternum in the country of the Sabines . Throughout his career Sallust always stood by his principle as a popularis , an opposer of Pompey 's party and the old aristocracy of Rome.
    Contents

    18. LibriVox » The Catiline Conspiracy And The Jugurthine War By Sallust
    sallust describes Catiline as the deliberate foe of law, order and morality (although party politics may have influenced his view). Still, sallust does recount Catiline’s noble
    http://librivox.org/the-catiline-conspiracy-and-the-jugurthine-war-by-sallust/
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    Catalog Index
    The Catiline Conspiracy and the Jugurthine War
    by Gaius Sallustius Crispus (Sallust) (86-34 BC) Translated by Alfred W. Pollard (1859-1944) Published 1882 The Catiline Conspiracy and The Jugurthine War Jugurthine War records the war in Numidia c.112 BC. This war, which introduces the rivals Marius and Sulla to the Roman political scene, recounts the downfall and capture of the Numidian King Jugurtha. There is an exciting description of an agile Ligurian agent of the Roman side entering a besieged enemy city. (Summary adapted from Wikipedia by Karen Merline) mp3 and ogg files

    19. Sallust - LoveToKnow 1911
    sallust Gaius GAIUS sallustIUS CRISPUS (8634 B.C.), Roman historian, belonging to a well-known plebeian family, was born at Amiternum in the country of the Sabines.
    http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Sallust
    Sallust
    From LoveToKnow 1911
    SALLUST Amiternum in the country of the Sabines. After an ill-spent youth he entered public life, and was elected tribune of the people in 52, the year in which Clodius was killed in a street brawl by the followers of Milo . Sallust was opposed to Milo and to Pompey's party and to the old aristocracy of Rome . From the first he was a decided partisan of Caesar, to whom he owed such political advancement as he attained. In 50 he was removed from the senate by the censor Appius Claudius Pulcher on the ground of gross immorality, the real reason probably being his friendship for Caesar. In the following year, no doubt through Caesar's influence, he was reinstated and appointed quaestor . In 46 he was praetor , and accompanied Caesar in his African campaign, which ended in the decisive defeat of the remains of the Pompeian party at Thapsus . As a reward for his services, Sallust was appointed governor of the province of Numidia . In this capacity he was guilty of such oppression and extortion that only the influence of Caesar enabled him to escape condemnation. On his return to Rome he purchased and laid out in great splendour the famous gardens on the Quirinal known as the Horti Sallustiani.

    20. The Catiline Conspiracy As Recorded By Sallust
    Excellent narrative history of the Catiline conspiracy of 63 BC, as recorded by sallust, whose conception of history is one of the finest in Latin literature.
    http://www.publicbookshelf.com/public_html/Outline_of_Great_Books_Volume_I/catal
    The Catiline conspiracy as recorded by Sallust
    A vigorous account of the notorious conspiracy of Catiline in 63 B.C. to overthrow the civil power in Rome, Sallust's Catiline is one of the best histories in Latin literature. The narrative is vivid and consistent, and the sketches of character are admirable in their power and conciseness. Although the author obviously hated the democratic party with which Catiline was connected, and had no great admiration for Cato or Cicero, his work is wonderfully impartial. Sallust's conception of history, indeed, as is exemplified also in his Jugurthine War, was very modern. He attempts to bring before his readers not only the incidents of history, but also their causes; further, he invariably seeks to establish the connexion between events that a contemporary would have treated as isolated facts.
    [THE PLOTTING]
    I esteem the intellectual above the physical qualities of man; and the task of the historian has attracted me because it taxes the writer's abilities to the utmost. Personal ambition had at first drawn me into public life, but the political atmosphere, full of degradation and corruption, was so uncongenial that I resolved to retire and devote myself to the production of a series of historical studies, for which I felt myself to be the better fitted by my freedom from the influences which bias the political partisan. For the first of these studies I have selected the conspiracy of Catiline.
    Lucius Catilina [commonly called Catiline] was of high birth, richly endowed both in mind and body, but of extreme depravity; with extraordinary powers of endurance, reckless, crafty and versatile, a master in the arts of deception, at once grasping and lavish, unbridled in his passions, ready of speech, but with little true insight. Of insatiable and inordinate ambitions, he was possessed, after Sulla's supremacy, with a craving to grasp the control of the state, utterly careless of the means so the end were attained. Naturally headstrong, he was urged forward by his want of money, the consciousness of his crimes and the degradation of morals in a society where luxury and greed ruled side by side.

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