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         African Violets:     more books (101)
  1. African Violets Back to the Basics: Your Questions Answered by Melvin Robey, 2006-12-20
  2. African Violets: The Complete Guide (Complete Guides) by Joan Hill, Gwen Goodship, 1998-03-01
  3. The African Violet Handbook by Tony Clements, 2003-04
  4. African Violets by Tony Clements, 1992-02-15
  5. All About African Violets: The Complete Guide to Success With Saintpaulias by Montague Free, 1979-05
  6. Growing to Show: How to Grow Prize Winning African Violets by Pauline Bartholomew, 1987-06
  7. How to Grow African Violets by David E. Clark, 1973
  8. African Violets by Melvin J. Robey, 1982-01
  9. You Can Grow African Violets: The Official Guide Authorized by the African Violet Society of America, Inc. by Joyce Stork, 2007-06-22
  10. African Violets and Flowering Houseplants (05334) by Charles C. Powell, 1985-07
  11. 1001 African Violet Questions Answered By Twelve Experts by Helen Van Pelt Wilson, 1958
  12. The African Violet: Saintpaulia by Helen Van Pelt Wilson, 1949
  13. How to grow and bloom African violets at home by J. Lawrence Heinl, 1973
  14. African Violets: Gifts from Nature by Melvin J. Robey, 1988-06

1. African Violets, Houseplants, Plants, Seeds, Bulbs, Gardening & Plants At Online
African Violets, Houseplants, Plants, Seeds, Bulbs, Gardening Plants. Huge Selection of Home Decor, Bedding, Furniture, Gardening Items. A better way to shop online!
http://www.search-recipe.com/african_violets.htm
Shop everything for your home improvement project. Find best deals on home appliances and gardening supplies on Amazon with great savings!
African Violets
Home
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Fertilizer, Soil Amendments
Garden Dcor
Outdoor Lighting
Planters, Pots, Window Boxes
Plants, Seeds, Bulbs
Aquatic Plants
Other Plants, Seedlings Plants Bog Plants Lotus Plants Marginal, Shallow Plants Oxygenating Plants Water Hyacinth Plants Water Lilies Plants, Seedlings Seeds Bonsai Plants, Seedlings Seeds Ferns Flower Bulbs, Roots, Corms Amaryllis Caladium Crocus Daffodil Dahlia Gladiolus Hyacinth Iris Lily Mixed Lots Other Bulbs, Roots, Corms Peony Tulip Flower Plants, Seedlings Annuals Biennials Mixed Perennials Other Perennials Perennials Perennials Brugmansia Perennials Butterfly... Perennials Clematis Perennials Columbine Perennials Daisy Perennials Daylily Perennials Hosta Perennials Iris Perennials Lavender Perennials Phlox Perennials Sedum Perennials Violet Flower Seeds Annuals Annuals Alyssum Annuals Bachelor's Button Annuals Cosmos Annuals Marigold Annuals Mixed Annual Seeds Annuals Morning Glory Annuals Petunia Annuals Poppy Annuals Sunflower Annuals Zinnia Biennials Mixed Perennials Other Annual Seeds Other Perennials Perennials Perennials Columbine Perennials Daisy Perennials Hibiscus Perennials Hollyhock Perennials Hosta Perennials Lavender Perennials Lily Perennials Penstemon Perennials Poppy Perennials Primrose Perennials Purple Coneflower Groundcovers, Vines

2. African Violets
Container gardening with African Violets African Violet. African Violets – do they deserve their finicky flowering reputation?
http://wnyalive.com/indoor/african_violets.htm
Indoor Garden Guides African Violet African Violets – do they deserve their finicky flowering reputation? Yes and No. While African Violets flourish with a precise recipe of light, moisture, warmth and feeding, once you know the recipe, it’s an easy one to follow. It helps to understand African Violets if you know their origin. African Violets are native to Tanzania, which is in East Africa. This means they tend to grow best under similar conditions to their native environment, which is a warm climate with a lighter, airy growing medium rather than a heavy potting soil. Why isn’t my African Violet Flowering?

3. African Violets
PLACE ORDER. HOME PAGE. PLANT SPECIALS. AFRICAN VIOLETS Standard violets Russian hybrid violets Standard chimeras Miniature violets Miniature chimeras
http://www.robsviolet.com/african_violets.htm
The Violet Barn PLACE ORDER HOME PAGE PLANT SPECIALS AFRICAN VIOLETS ... PLACE ORDER African violets Use this page to view the latest African violet varieties available in our 2009 catalog. We're famous for our miniature and trailing African violet hybrids. All 'Rob's' varieties are proven, show-quality plants that grow and bloom readily, even under less than ideal conditions. They are bred to shape nicely, bloom continually, and typically will have unusually colored and larger than average-size blooms. All do well under either artificial or natural light. We also grow many standard-size varieties (actually more than we do minis!). Our 'Ma's' varieties of standard-sized African violets possess the same characteristics and have become favorites of both hobbyist and collector. We grow only superior varieties that grow and bloom easily. We have no interest in growing "problem plants". Most will also make excellent show plants for those interested in exhibition. 'Click' on the highlighted words within text, the

4. African Violets
African violet is a flowering plant, a genus of six species of herbaceous perennial in the family Gesneriaceae. It is also known as Saintpaulia and is native to Tanzania and
http://www.kosmix.com/topic/African_violets
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African Violets
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Articles for African Violets
The Kosmix Community Author: stanley varghese African violet is a flowering plant, a genus of six species of herbaceous perennial in the family Gesneriaceae. It is also known as Saintpaulia and is native to Tanzania and adjacent southeastern Kenya, with a concentration of species in the Nguru mountains of Tanzania. African violet is closely related to Streptocarpus and a recent phylogenetic study suggests that it has evolved directly from subgenus Streptocarpella. The name of the flowering plant was given due to a superficial resemblance to true violets. African violet has furry soft leaves and dainty blooms quickly, it is ... see more African violet is a flowering plant, a genus of six species of herbaceous perennial in the family Gesneriaceae. It is also known as Saintpaulia and is native to Tanzania and adjacent southeastern Kenya, with a concentration of species in the Nguru mountains of Tanzania. African violet is closely related to Streptocarpus and a recent phylogenetic study suggests that it has evolved directly from subgenus Streptocarpella. The name of the flowering plant was given due to a superficial resemblance to true violets. African violet has furry soft leaves and dainty blooms quickly, it is one of those rare house plants that really are easy to look after. The plant is widely cultivated as house plants. Only a few of these species have been used in breeding programs for the hybrids presently available in the market. African violet plants are cultivars derived from Saintpaulia ionantha. Today, there is a wide range of species and are sources of genes to be introduced into modern cultivars.

5. African Violets
The African Violet, Saintpaulia ionantha, is among the most popular of house plants with wholesale sales in 1995 exceeding 25 million dollars.
http://www.ag.auburn.edu/hort/landscape/African_Violets.htm
Cultivars Propagation Growing Environment Potting and Finishing ... Pests History and Market The African Violet, Saintpaulia ionantha, is among the most popular of house plants with wholesale sales in 1995 exceeding 25 million dollars. This popularity is due to its ability to thrive under conditions commonly found in most homes, and its usefulness as a specimen plant, center piece, or feature in dish gardens. Since its introduction into the United States in 1894, hundreds of African Violet cultivars have been developed that provide a wide range of flower colors, foliage types, and plant sizes. Though many Americans purchase African Violets as an impulse item, there are dedicated enthusiasts who grow, breed, and show them. African Violets were originally discovered in 1892 in two separate locations of northeast Tanga in Eastern Africa by Baron Walter von Saint Paul, then governor of German East Africa. Saint Paul sent either plants or seed to his father in Germany where they quickly became popular in European Horticultural circles. Herman Wendlan, a prominent botanist at the Royal Botanical Gardens in Herrenhausen Germany, gave the genus name Saintpaulia in honor of its discoverer, and the two species, S. ionantha and S. confusa, became parents to most of the cultivators available today. Most commercial growers of African Violets in this country do so on a modest scale. These growers usually obtain established transplants from a wholesale propagator for either year-round production or, more often, to meet seasonal demand. However, there are a number of large scale operations that propagate and produce upward of one million plants a year. The primary marketing holidays for African Violets are Saint Valentine's Day, Easter, and Mother's Day.

6. Aggie Horticulture African Violets
Proposed site covering many aspects of African violets. Currently, mostly links to other resources.
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/violet/violet.html
Welcome to
African Violets

from Aggie Horticulture The Gesneriphile mail group expressed an interest in a Web site for African violets and other gesneriads. The following hastily assembled set of images and links is intended to display what one person's (Dan Lineberger's) view of such a Web site might contain.
The Growing Number of African Violet and Gesneriad Web Pages
African Violets International Discussion Group
African Violet Anonymous Discussion Group
AVCONNECTIONN News Group
African Violet Society of America ...
I Love Plants African Violet Page
Online Discussion Groups
African Violet Friends
Violets of All Types
American Violet Society
African Violet Books
Pictures, Pictures Pictures Pictures!
Any Web site pretending to represent the gesneriads and African violets should be replete with lots of pictures. Some should be artistic, but most should represent a cataloging of the diversity that exists within the family. My principal interest has focused on chimeral plants, and the Web site should be able to account for specialized interests as well.
Products for Successful African Violet Culture
KiekiGrow Offshoot Stimulator
Insects and Related Pests of African Violets
Research results
The Web is a wonderful place to highlight research results. The information can be "hot off the press" because display and delivery through the Web is instantaneous. I have posted some of my African violet research in the

7. How To Grow Perfect African Violets
Shows you how to grow perfect African violets, using easyto-understand graphics
http://www.theplantexpert.com/africanviolets/
How to grow perfect African violets
Always wanted to have gorgeous African violets, but never had much success? This site will tell you everything you need to know. Just click on the "Enter Here" and away you go!
Enter Here

8. AVSA HOMEPAGE Default
Presenting information about growing, showing and propagating African violets and other gesnariads.
http://avsa.org/

9. How To Care For African Violets | EHow.com
African violets are common house plants that are beautiful to look at. African violets are not very difficult to keep healthy, but they do have certain needs they require in
http://www.ehow.com/how_2387004_care-african-violets.html
  • Family Food Health Home Money Style More
Home Growing Flowers How to Care for African Violets
Top 5 To Try
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How to Care for African Violets
By an eHow Contributor I want to do this! What's This? African violets are common house plants that are beautiful to look at. African violets are not very difficult to keep healthy, but they do have certain needs they require in order to survive. Difficulty: Moderately Easy
Instructions
  • Keep your African violets indoors only and by a window. African violets like to get a bit of sunlight each day. If you can put your flowers in a window looking out to the east, they can get their needed sunlight every morning. Water your African violets only after you have let your water sit in your watering can for eight hours or so. This will let any water impurities evaporate into the air. African violets do not do as well with chemicals that are found naturally in tap water. Place the watering can near the soil of your African violets pot when watering the flowers. The leaves of African violets should not get wet if you can help it. Water your African violets any time the soil that they live in becomes dry. You might have to check the soil for moisture every couple of days.
  • 10. Nouvelle Page 1
    Quebec-based grower sells a variety of African violets.
    http://www.bloomlovers.com/
    Cette page utilise des cadres, mais votre navigateur ne les prend pas en charge.

    11. African Violets | Garden Guides
    African Violets. How to grow African Violets . by Susan Ward . Copyright by Susan Ward. All Rights Reserved. My Aunt was known as the African Violet lady and no wonder.
    http://www.gardenguides.com/675-african-violets.html

    12. Travis Violets: Ocklocknee, Georgia
    African Violet plants, leaves, other related items.
    http://www.travisviolets.com/

    13. Saintpaulia - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
    Saintpaulia, commonly known as African violet, is a genus of six species of herbaceous perennial flowering plants in the family Gesneriaceae, native to Tanzania and adjacent
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saintpaulia
    Saintpaulia
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation search Saintpaulia a Saintpaulia ionantha cultivar Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae
    (unranked): Angiosperms
    (unranked): Eudicots
    (unranked): Asterids
    Order: Lamiales
    Family: Gesneriaceae
    Genus: Saintpaulia
    J.C.Wendl.
    Species Saintpaulia inconspicua
    Saintpaulia goetzeana

    Saintpaulia ionantha

    Saintpaulia pusilla
    ... Saintpaulia teitensis
    Close up Saintpaulia rupicola S. ionantha ssp. rupicola A pink, just flowering cultivar Saintpaulia , commonly known as African violet , is a genus of six species of herbaceous perennial flowering plants in the family Gesneriaceae , native to Tanzania and adjacent southeastern Kenya in eastern tropical Africa , with a concentration of species in the Nguru mountains of Tanzania. The genus is most closely related to Streptocarpus , with recent phylogenetic studies suggesting it has evolved directly from subgenus Streptocarpella . The common name was given due to a superficial resemblance to true violets Viola , family Violaceae
    Contents
    edit Taxonomy
    The genus is named after Baron Walter von Saint Paul-Illaire (1860–1910), the district commissioner of

    14. Welcome To

    The KIWI VIOLET ROOM
    New Zealand enthusiast sells African Violets and other gesneriads. Ships internationally. Site also provides photos of her personal collection and growing advice.
    http://www.angelfire.com/id/goldenkiwi/AfricanViolets.html

    Welcome to The KIWI VIOLET ROOM
    Website page index: AFRICAN VIOLETS FOR SALE
    2009 Album NZ VARIETIES

    My WEBSHOTS ALBUMS

    Album 1 ~ African Violets
    ...
    Kiwi FRANGIPANI - New Page!

    UPDATED ~ 10 June 2010
    Thank you for visiting - welcome to my Internet Violet Room, do have a good look around; I hope
    you will enjoy browsing in my Pages, and looking at my Photo albums :) I am slowly getting back into 'growing mode' again, sown some of my own AV crosses and now on my way.
    A few of the resulting flowering seedlings, which I call my "miracle babies" seem quite nice and are giving me a great deal of pleasure.
    My current goal is Small, Variegated and Show Quality. What do You think of them? Your feedback is appreciated.
    PHOTOS of a few are now displayed in my WEBSHOTS Albums. Some varieties May be released early 2009, all going well... BOOKMARK THIS PAGE AND REFRESH FOR UPDATES Hi, I'm Karen. Thank You for Visiting Me :) You are invited to Chat in my chatroom (just below), just EMAIL ME to arrange a time. Or Send Me A Message on MSN or Yahoo IM, hope to catch up with you Online.

    15. The Violet Barn, Home Of Rob's Violets
    Breeder and grower of African violets and other exotic houseplants.
    http://www.robsviolet.com/
    PLACE ORDER HOME PAGE PLANT SPECIALS AFRICAN VIOLETS ... PLACE ORDER The Violet Barn Unusual Show-quality African Violets and Gesneriads
    Rare and Collectible Houseplants
    Shipping anywhere, anytimeSafe delivery guranteed!
    Growers and exhibitors of African Violets since 1975, Commercial member AVSA since 1985
    10-time winners Best New Cultivar, 12-time Best Commercial Display AVSA National Convention Show
    Bronze Medal Award for lifetime achievements by African Violet Society of America "Click" on highlighted plant names to go to that page, on buttons at left, or on photos See our collection of unusual, collectible, African violet hybrids
    Standard violets
    . These grow 10-12" or larger in diameter.
    Miniature violets
    . These grow 6" or less in diameter.
    Trailing violets
    . Spreading plants. As baskets or as ground covers. We also grow a great number of African violet "cousins"plants in the Gesneriad family: pictured from left to right Chirita . Easy growers, from China and SE Asia.
    Episcia
    (flame violets). Colorful patterned foliage, bright blooms.

    16. OPTIMARA HOME PAGE
    With http//www.optimara.com we reach our consumers with valuable plant care information. Beautiful African Violets, exciting value added items and plant care products.
    http://www.optimara.com/
    The Company was founded in 1904, by Martin Dorrenbach in Isselburg, in the lower Rhein Valley of Germany. By the 1930's, the son-in-law and horticulturist, Hermann Holtkamp, Sr. started to breed his first Saintpaulias on only one square meter (10.76 square feet) of greenhouse space. After the war Hermann Holtkamp Sr. intensified his breeding efforts and by the early part of 1950's, the first real success gave the breeder hope for the plant's future. At the time, Mr. Holtkamp said that the African Violet would be the potted plant of the future. Our company grew many different crops, later to be replaced, one by one, by the African Violet. Reinhold Holtkamp, Sr., (right) serves as president with his wife Gisela Holtkamp, and his son, Reinhold, Jr., (left) as vice president of Optimara/Holtkamp Greenhouses. MAIN MENU Care Instructions
    Doctor Optimara

    Diagnosis

    Pests and Pathogens
    ...
    Contact Us
    One of the most exciting breakthroughs in the research and development of the African Violet was in the early 1960's, with the introduction of the first non-dropping variety called Elfriede. Today all of Optimara Varieties and most all other competitive varieties available on the market have this characteristic.
    In 1961, the name of the company changed from Dorrenbach-Holtkamp Greenhouses to Hermann Holtkamp, KG. In 1977, Holtkamp Greenhouses was founded in Nashville, Tennessee, and the Optimara brand name was introduced to the American consumer.

    17. ENH17/MG028: African Violets
    The African violet (Saintpaulia species) is a popular houseplant that grows and flowers under light conditions found in the average home or under artificial light.
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg028

    Download PDF
    Publication #ENH17
    African Violets
    Sydney Park Brown The African violet ( Saintpaulia species) is a popular houseplant that grows and flowers under light conditions found in the average home or under artificial light. Many different varieties, types, and flower colors exist.
    Light Intensity
    For best growth and flowering, African violets require bright light (~1000 foot candles), but no direct sunlight. This is the amount of light within 3 feet of a southeast- or west- facing window. Lower light levels for longer periods of time are also adequate. The appearance of a plant will indicate whether light levels are too high, too low or just right. If light is too low, leaves are usually thin and deep green, and appear to reach up for light. The plants may grow, but will flower poorly or not at all. In such instances, supplemental artificial light will help promote flowering. Excessive light causes leaves to be pale or greenish-yellow. Some leaves may show dark green areas where they have been shaded by upper leaves. Growth slows when light is too high and plants become very compact. Flowering will also begin to decrease.

    18. Questions On Violets
    Q I have a local resident that has a question about her African violets. She transplanted them back in December 2005. Since then, the plant has not bloomed.
    http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extnews/hortiscope/flowers/violet.htm
    Questions on: Violets Ron Smith, Horticulturist, NDSU Extension Service Q: I have a local resident that has a question about her African violets. She transplanted them back in December 2005. Since then, the plant has not bloomed. She now has a few blooms on a couple of plants. She switched from well water to rain and snow water. While using well water, a crusty, white residue was appearing on the bottom of the pots. She is so frustrated that she admits to throwing away some of the plants. She is seeking your help before she throws all the plants out the door. (Griggs County, N.D.) A: She should not have used well water. African violets are raised on pure rainwater in their native setting, so she should stick to the rain or snow water to get the plants blooming again. She also needs a dose of patience. Blooming, which is the reproductive cycle of any plant, requires stored energy. Insufficient energy equals poor or no blooms. When they get to that point of sufficient energy and mild stress, they will bloom. African violets should not be thrown out the door, especially in North Dakota! Q: I have African violets that are doing well, but a few leaves are losing color and becoming white. There are no insect infestations and I do not think it is a fungus or mold. This has happened once before, but it went away. I would like to find out what causes the problem because the plants are very unattractive during this period. (e-mail reference)

    19. African-violets.com
    Recent hybrids, old favorites, pots, soil, fertilizer, and information. Rare yellow violet varieties, epischias, streptocarpus, and chimeras available. Certified for worldwide shipping.
    http://www.african-violets.com/
    african-violets.com
    Search the Web:

    20. African Violets, African Violet Photos, African Violets Images, African Violets
    Seller/trader of African violet plants and leaves, as well as growing and propagation supplies. Online listing, with photos for most varieties. Located in Washington state.
    http://www.reedsgreenhouse.com/

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    www.ReedsGreenhouse.com
    www.AfricanViolets.us
    Please SUPPORT the African Violet Society of America
    They have an Incredible African violet magazine
    www.AfricanViolets.us Fun and Easy Magic Tricks for everyone.
    Including Tenyo Magic
    New software and new topics
    Please take a minutes and post a few messages to help rebuilt the forums FREE African Violet Leaves
    by posting messages on the forums. Details are posted in the forums,
    African violets and supplies, Ancient Treasures, Egyptian museum Reproductions, Archangels
    Goto the Photo Archives Leaves on Internet the Info, Tips, and Hints Page Goto the African Violets Photo Index of the AVSA Magazine.
    Links
    to other Great African Violets pages Sitemap Images my not be used on ANY other web site without Permission, Full Credit Given and Web Link to my site
    To contact me: Steverd@steverd.com Powered by WebRing This site is a member of WebRing. To browse visit here

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