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         Earthquake Measurement:     more books (100)
  1. Earthquake Measurement (1883) by James Alfred Ewing, 2010-09-10
  2. Earthquake, Blast and Impact: Measurement and effects of vibration by Seced - The Society For Earthquake & Civil Engineering Dynamics, 1990-12-31
  3. Earthquake history and measurement with application to the Lake Michigan drainage basin (ANL/ES-40) by Richard B Keener, 1974
  4. National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program : Proceedings of Conference, Stress and Strain Measurements Related to Earthquake Prediction by National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program., 1978-01-01
  5. Earthquake Measurement (1883) by James Alfred Ewing, 2010-09-10
  6. Earthquake: An entry from Thomson Gale's <i>Gale Encyclopedia of Science, 3rd ed.</i> by Bill Hanneberg, 2004
  7. Reliability-based earthquake design of jacket-type offshore platforms considering pile-soil-structure interaction.(Report): An article from: American Journal of Applied Sciences by Behrouz Asgarian, Hossein Agheshlui, 2009-04-01
  8. Earthquake: An entry from UXL's <i>UXL Encyclopedia of Science</i>
  9. Earthquake Disaster.(earthquake in India and cause of earthquakes): An article from: Junior Scholastic
  10. Instrumentation for Ground Vibration and Earthquakes
  11. On a neglected principle that may be employed in earthquake measurements by John Perry, 1877
  12. The May 6, 1976 Friuli earthquake: Field measurements by Dimitri J Papastamatiou, 1977
  13. Design of the Shell project: Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System (SEMS) (SAND) by James P Hickerson, 1987
  14. Analysis of earthquake recordings obtained from the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System (SEMS) instruments deployed off the coast of southern California (SuDoc I 19.76:97-733) by David M. Boore, 1998

1. Answers.com - What Earthquake Measurement Is More Effective Intensity Or Strengt
Can you answer this question? Answer it or get updates discuss research share Facebook Twitter Search Related answers Why is the intensity of an earthquake more important
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_earthquake_measurement_is_more_effective_intensit

2. Earthquake Measurement
Earthquake Measurement . Earthquakes are measured with a device called a seismograph. The Richter scale measures the magnitude (size) of an earthquake on a scale of 1 to 10 using a
http://www.geography.info/earthquakes/10/earthquake_measurement.html
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Earthquake Measurement Earthquakes are measured with a device called a seismograph. The Richter scale measures the magnitude (size) of an earthquake on a scale of 1 to 10 using a seismograph. Each step in the scale indicates a tenfold increase in the energy of the earthquake. The Richter scale was devised in the 1930s by an American geophysicist called Charles Richter (1900 - 1985). The most powerful earthquake ever recorded was in Chile in 1960, which regidtered 9.5 on Richter scale. Between 10 and 20 earthquakes each year reach 7 on the Richter scale. The Modified Mercalli scale assesses an earthquake's severity according to its effects on a scale of 1 to 12 in Roman numerals (I - XII). A Mercalli scale I earthquake is one that is only detectable with special instruments. A Mercalli scale XII earthquake causes almost total destruction of cities and reshapes the landscape.
home
planet earth volcanoes earthquakes ... ITWebTeam.net

3. Earthquake Measurement | Products & Suppliers On GlobalSpec
Find earthquake measurement related suppliers, manufacturers, products and specifications on GlobalSpec a trusted source of earthquake measurement information.
http://www.globalspec.com/Industrial-Directory/earthquake_measurement

4. Earthquake Measurement Scale Summary | BookRags.com
Earthquake Measurement Scale. Earthquake Measurement Scale summary with 3 pages of encyclopedia entries, research information, and more.
http://www.bookrags.com/research/earthquake-measurement-scale-woi/

5. Measurement
Measurement. Earthquakes can be measured in several ways. The first way is to describe the earthquake's intensity. Intensity is the measure, in terms of degrees
http://scign.jpl.nasa.gov/learn/eq8.htm
Measurement
Earthquakes can be measured in several ways. The first way is to describe the earthquake's intensity. Intensity is the measure, in terms of degrees, of damage to the surface and the effects on humans. Intensity records only observations of effects on the crust, not actual ground motion or wave amplitudes which can be recorded by instruments. While intensity helps to determine how large of an area was effected, it is not an accurate measure of the earthquake for many reasons. Two such reasons are: only the effect on an area showing the greatest intensity is reported, which can imply a greater or lesser intensity than what actually occurred, and the way in which seismic waves travel varies as they pass through different types of rocks, so some areas near by may feel nothing because they are built on faulted rock, while other areas quite a distance from the foci will feel the effects because they are built on compact homogenous rocks. The second type of measurement is the magnitude of the earthquake. Magnitude does not depend on population and effects to ground structures, but rather on wave amplitude and distance. Magnitude is determined using mathematical formulae and information from seismograms. One such magnitude scale is the Richter scale. This magnitude scale is logarithmic, meaning each step in magnitude is exponentially greater than the last.

6. Earthquake Measurement By James Alfred Ewing | Flipkart Books
Flipkart.com Earthquake Measurement (1883) by James Alfred Ewing. Rs.728, Save 25%. Buy Earthquake Measurement , All India Free Home Delivery. 1120190444, 9781120190444
http://www.flipkart.com/earthquake-measurement-james-alfred-ewing-book-112019044

7. Answers.com - What Is The Name Of The Instrument Used For Measuring Earthquake S
A seismometer (replacing the outdated term seismograph), but other instruments may also respond to an earthquake. The simplest example of a seismograph is a pendulum.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_name_of_the_instrument_used_for_measuring_

8. Richter Magnitude Scale - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
The Richter magnitude scale, also known as the local magnitude (M L) scale, assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richter_magnitude_scale
Richter magnitude scale
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This is the latest accepted revision accepted on 9 November 2010 Jump to: navigation search The Richter magnitude scale , also known as the local magnitude M L scale , assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake . It is a base-10 logarithmic scale obtained by calculating the logarithm of the combined horizontal amplitude (shaking amplitude) of the largest displacement from zero on a particular type of seismometer (Wood–Anderson torsion). So, for example, an earthquake that measures 5.0 on the Richter scale has a shaking amplitude 10 times larger than one that measures 4.0. The effective limit of measurement for local magnitude M L is about 6.8. The Richter scale has been superseded by the moment magnitude scale , which is calibrated to give generally similar values for medium-sized earthquakes (magnitudes between 3 and 7). Unlike the Richter scale, the moment magnitude scale reports a fundamental property of the earthquake derived from instrument data, rather than reporting instrument data which is not always comparable across earthquakes, and does not saturate in the high-magnitude range. Since the Moment Magnitude scale generally yields very similar results to the Richter scale, magnitudes of earthquakes reported in the mass media are usually reported without indicating which scale is being used. The energy release of an earthquake, which closely correlates to its destructive power, scales with the

9. Earthquake Museum-1994 Northridge Earthquake
Visit the Earthquake Museum for everything you want to know about Earthquakes. 1994 Northridge, California Earthquake information and links. The most expensive earthquake in US
http://www.olympus.net/personal/gofamily/quake/famous/northridge.html
1994 Northridge Earthquake
The 6.7 Magnitude Northridge Earthquake struck early in the early morning of January 17, 1994 at 4:31 AM. The Epicenter was in Northridge, California, a suburb of Los Angeles in the San Fernando Valley. This same general area had been hit by a 6.6 Magnitude quake in 1971. It was one of the most expensive natural disasters in US history, with total damage estimated at $15 billion. The death toll of 57 and 1500 serious injuries is considered low for a quake of this size in a heavily populated area. This was one of the best prepared areas in the world. Most people were safe in their beds at the time of the quke, reducing the casualties. Earthquake awareness in California was high following the 1971 San Fernando quake in this same area and the 1989 Loma Prieta quake in northern California. Building codes required earthquake resistant designs that prevented outright collapse in almost all cases.

10. How Are Earthquake Magnitudes Measured?
The magnitude of most earthquakes is measured on the Richter scale, invented by Charles F. Richter in 1934. The Richter magnitude is calculated from the amplitude of the largest
http://www.geo.mtu.edu/UPSeis/intensity.html
How Are Earthquake Magnitudes Measured? The Richter Scale
Figure 1 - Charles Richter studying a seismogram. The magnitude of most earthquakes is measured on the Richter scale , invented by Charles F. Richter in 1934. The Richter magnitude is calculated from the amplitude of the largest seismic wave recorded for the earthquake, no matter what type of wave was the strongest.
The Richter magnitudes are based on a logarithmic scale (base 10). What this means is that for each whole number you go up on the Richter scale, the amplitude of the ground motion recorded by a seismograph goes up ten times. Using this scale, a magnitude 5 earthquake would result in ten times the level of ground shaking as a magnitude 4 earthquake (and 32 times as much energy would be released). To give you an idea how these numbers can add up, think of it in terms of the energy released by explosives: a magnitude 1 seismic wave releases as much energy as blowing up 6 ounces of TNT. A magnitude 8 earthquake releases as much energy as detonating 6 million tons of TNT . Pretty impressive, huh? Fortunately, most of the earthquakes that occur each year are magnitude 2.5 or less, too small to be felt by most people.

11. Richter Magnitude Scale Summary And Analysis Summary | BookRags.com
Earthquake Measurement Scale Summary 783 words, approx. 3 pages. The earliest earthquake measurements were simple descriptions of seismic events
http://www.bookrags.com/Richter_magnitude_scale

12. How Do Scientists Measure Earthquakes?
How do scientists measure earthquakes? With a really big ruler? No, not quite. There are two ways in which scientists quantify the size of earthquakes magnitude and intensity.
http://tremor.nmt.edu/faq/how.html
How do scientists measure earthquakes?
With a really big ruler? No, not quite. There are two ways in which scientists quantify the size of earthquakes: magnitude and intensity. Magnitude is a measure of the amount of energy released during an earthquake, and you've probably heard news reports about earthquake magnitudes measured using the Richter scale. Something like, "A magnitude 7.3 earthquake struck Japan today. Details at ten." Did you ever wonder why, if it's that important, they just don't tell you right away? The Richter scale was invented, logically enough, in the 1930s by Dr. Charles Richter , a seismologist at the California Institute of Technology. It is a measure of the largest seismic wave recorded on a particular kind of seismograph located 100 kilometers (about 62 miles) from the epicenter of the earthquake. Think of a seismograph as a kind of sensitive pendulum that records the shaking of the Earth. The output of a seismograph is known as a seismogram. In the early days, seismograms were produced using ink pens on paper or beams of light on photographic paper, but now it's most often done digitally using computers. The seismograph that Dr. Richter used amplified movements by a factor of 3000, so the waves on the seismograms were much bigger than those that actually occurred in the Earth. The epicenter of an earthquake is the point on the Earth's surface directly above the source, or focus, of the movement that causes the quake. Dr. Richter studied records from many earthquakes in southern California, and realized that some earthquakes made very small waves whereas others produced large waves. So, to make it easier to compare the sizes of the waves he recorded, Richter used the logarithms of the wave heights on seismograms measured in microns (1/1,000,000th of a meter, or 1/1000th of a millimeter). Remember, you have to be using a particular kind of seismograph located 100 km from the epicenter when you make the measurement; otherwise, all sorts of complicated calculations have to be made. That's why seismologists spend so many years in college!

13. Terrestrial Communities - NatureWorks
Solid earth, it's home to a wide variety of the Earth's species. It comes in all different kinds of shapes and sizes from the frozen tundra to the desert. - NatureWorks
http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/nwep8.htm
Terrestrial Communities
Solid earth, it's home to a wide variety of the Earth's species. It comes in all different kinds of shapes and sizes - from the frozen tundra to the desert. Different types of environments are called biomes . Biomes share climate, and plant and animal life. Land biomes include: Tundra - Find out about life in one of the worlds harshest environments. Taiga - Cold in the winter and warm in the summer, the taiga is the world's largest land biome. Temperate/Deciduous Forests - Organisms in temperate deciduous forest must be able to adapt to four distinct seasons. Grasslands - Grasslands cover one quarter of the Earth's land area. Rainforests - Whether they are temperate or tropical all rainforests have one thing in common lots of rain!
Deserts
- Deserts are the most extreme of the land biomes and they can be hot or cold! Did You Know? ... that there are cold and hot deserts. ... that the taiga is the world's largest land biome. ... that tropical rainforest can get as much as 400 inches of rain a year. What Do You Think?

14. Measuring The Size Of An Earthquake
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program, responsible for monitoring, reporting, and researching earthquakes and earthquake hazards
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/topics/measure.php
Earthquake Hazards Program ... Research
Measuring the Size of an Earthquake
Earthquakes range broadly in size. A rock-burst in an Idaho silver mine may involve the fracture of 1 meter of rock; the 1965 Rat Island earthquake in the Aleutian arc involved a 650 kilometer length of the Earth's crust. Earthquakes can be even smaller and even larger. If an earthquake is felt or causes perceptible surface damage, then its intensity of shaking can be subjectively estimated. But many large earthquakes occur in oceanic areas or at great focal depths and are either simply not felt or their felt pattern does not really indicate their true size. Today, state of the art seismic systems transmit data from the seismograph via telephone line and satellite directly to a central digital computer. A preliminary location, depth-of-focus, and magnitude can now be obtained within minutes of the onset of an earthquake. The only limiting factor is how long the seismic waves take to travel from the epicenter to the stations - usually less than 10 minutes. Magnitude Richter's original magnitude scale ( M L ) was then extended to observations of earthquakes of any distance and of focal depths ranging between and 700 km. Because earthquakes excite both body waves, which travel into and through the Earth, and surface waves, which are constrained to follow the natural wave guide of the Earth's uppermost layers, two magnitude scales evolved - the

15. Chile Was Ready For Quake, Haiti Wasn't - World News - Haiti Earthquake - Msnbc.
Feb 28, 2010 The earthquake in Chile was far stronger than the one that struck Haiti last month — yet the death toll in Haiti is magnitudes higher. The reasons are simple.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35623502/ns/world_news-haiti_earthquake
var collarity_appid = 'msnbc';var collarity_kw = 'Chile,United States occupation of Haiti';var collarity_tags = ''; Jump to story headline Haiti earthquake on msnbc.com Search ad info
Chile was ready for earthquake, Haiti wasn't
Chile has history of dealing with temblors; Haiti's was first in living memory
Below:
  • ad info AP, EPA By FRANK BAJAK Associated Press Writer The Associated Press updated 2/28/2010 8:44:03 AM ET The earthquake in Chile was far stronger than the one that struck Haiti last month — yet the death toll in this Caribbean nation is magnitudes higher. The reasons are simple. Chile is wealthier and infinitely better prepared, with strict building codes, robust emergency response and a long history of handling seismic catastrophes. No living Haitian had experienced a quake at home when the Jan. 12 disaster crumbled their poorly constructed buildings. And Chile was relatively lucky this time.
  • 16. Earthquake Measurement - Education Resource - StudySphere
    Education Portal, Educational Resource for language school, study abroad, education online, education, school, high school, career education, business school, driver education
    http://www.studysphere.com/education/Weights-and-Measurement-Earthquake-Measurem

    17. Earthquakes
    Purdue GK12 Lesson Plan 2006-07 Earthquakes Purdue University GK-12 Program 2006-07 Lead developers and contacts Carrie Davis Todd Purdue University GK-12 Fellow Department of Earth
    http://www.purdue.edu/dp/gk12/downloads/Earthquakes.pdf

    18. 454 Earthquake Measurement Lesson Plans Reviewed By Teachers
    Search earthquake measurement lesson plans to find teacher approved lesson plans. Quickly find lesson plans that inspire student learning.
    http://www.lessonplanet.com/search?keywords=earthquake measurement&media=les

    19. A Quick Tour Of Earthquake Magnitudes
    This earthquake measurement scale is most appropriate for earthquakes that occur at distances greater than 12 degrees (about 1300 kilometers since 1 degree = 111 kilometers
    http://wcatwc.arh.noaa.gov/about/magnitude.htm
    Have you ever wondered why there were two or three different magnitudes for the same earthquake? Earthquakes are measured in a number of different ways. One of those ways is to identify the size (energy released) of an earthquake in units of magnitude. There are different methods for getting a magnitude. There is a magnitude that is based on the body waves that travel deep within the earths interior. There is a method to calculate a earthquakes magnitude from the seismic surface waves that travel along the surface layers of the earth. There is even a method that defines a magnitude based on how much of the earth broke during the earthquake. The most commonly used magnitudes are the Ml, Mb, MS and Mw types. The Ml or Local (Richter) Magnitude is based on the maximum amplitude (A) in micrometers recorded on standard short period (1 sec) seismometer. Ml = logA logA0, Where A0 is a standard value as a function of distance. This magnitude is good for earthquakes less than 1000 kilometers from the instrument measuring the earthquake. It is valid for earthquakes less than 6 units of magnitude. The Mb or Body Wave Magnitude is based on the amplitude of the P body waves generated by the earthquake. This earthquake measurement scale is most appropriate for earthquakes that occur at distances greater than 12 degrees (about 1300 kilometers since 1 degree = 111 kilometers) from a seismometer. This scale is valid for magnitudes less than 6.5 units.

    20. Earthquake - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
    An earthquake (also known as a quake, tremor or temblor) is the result of a sudden release of energy in the Earth's crust that creates seismic waves.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthquake
    Earthquake
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation search For other uses, see Earthquake (disambiguation) Global earthquake epicenters Global plate tectonic movement An earthquake (also known as a quake tremor or temblor ) is the result of a sudden release of energy in the Earth's crust that creates seismic waves . The seismicity or seismic activity of an area refers to the frequency, type and size of earthquakes experienced over a period of time. Earthquakes are measured with a seismometer ; a device which also records is known as a seismograph. The moment magnitude (or the related and mostly obsolete Richter magnitude) of an earthquake is conventionally reported, with magnitude 3 or lower earthquakes being mostly imperceptible and magnitude 7 causing serious damage over large areas. Intensity of shaking is measured on the modified Mercalli scale At the Earth's surface, earthquakes manifest themselves by shaking and sometimes displacing the ground. When a large earthquake epicenter is located offshore, the seabed sometimes suffers sufficient displacement to cause a tsunami . The shaking in earthquakes can also trigger landslides and occasionally volcanic activity. In its most generic sense, the word

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