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         Indonesian Cooking:     more books (91)
  1. The Indonesian Kitchen (Indonesian Kitchen 309 Ppr) by Marks Copeland, Mintari Soeharjo, 1984-03
  2. Indonesian Regional Cooking by Sri Owen, 1995-03
  3. The complete book of Indonesian cooking by Antoinette DeWit, 1973
  4. Homestyle Thai and Indonesian Cooking (Homestyle Cooking Series) by Sri Owen, Sti Owen, 1997-10
  5. FOOD & COOKING OF INDONESIA & by Ghillie Basan, 2007-08-25
  6. Slamat makan: The art of Indonesian cooking
  7. Cooking the Indonesian Way: Includes Low-Fat and Vegetarian Recipes (Easy Menu Ethnic Cookbooks) by Kari A. Cornell, Merry Anwar, 2004-01
  8. Adventures In Indonesian Cooking by Wassimena, 2010-05-22
  9. Cooking the Indonesian Way by Alec Robeau, 1980-04
  10. The new art of Indonesian cooking by Detlef Skrobanek, Suzanne Charle, 1988
  11. Indonesian Street Food Secrets by Keith Ruskin Miller, 2002-08-15
  12. Cook Indonesian by Agnes de Keijzer Brackman & Cathay Brackman, 2005-08-26
  13. The Indonesian Kitchen: Recipes and Stories by Sri Owen, 2008-10-31
  14. To All My Grandchildren: Lessons in Indonesian Cooking by Leonie Samuel-Hool, 1981-04-01

1. Catering
INDONESIAN COOKING INGREDIENTS. Below are listed some of the more unusual ingredients as used in Indonesian recipes. Included are as many spellings and different names as
http://www.bemcatering.com/indonesian_cooking_ingredients.htm
Catering Home DIY Catering Recipes Services
INDONESIAN COOKING INGREDIENTS Below are listed some of the more unusual ingredients as used in Indonesian recipes. Included are as many spellings and different names as possible but can not promise that this list is fully complete. Many of the more common fresh ingredients such as Ginger and Lemongrass are now available in the larger supermarkets but a very good source for fresh produce, sauces and spice mixes can be found at your local Chinese / Asian food stores. Many of the Herbs and Spices are available in your local stores and health food shops. The rule here is to buy as little as needed, so they are always fresh. It is preferable to buy spices like Cumin and Coriander as seeds and then grind them in a pestle when needed, the extra aroma is amazing.
Bean sprouts, Taog
Sprout of the mung or soya bean. Wash before use, remove as much of the seed pot as possible. Available fresh in most supermarkets. Also sold in tins but those have lost most of their crunchiness and flavour.
Basil , Lemon (daun kemangi): A fragrant, lemon-scented herb added at the last minute to keep its flavor, or used as a garnish. Although the flavor will be different, you can use another type of basil.

2. Indonesian Cooking Articles
All articles related to indonesian cooking written by Suite101 experts enter curious
http://www.suite101.com/reference/indonesian_cooking

3. CMN Video: Indonesian Cooking - Kelepon - Associated Content - Associatedcontent
CMN Video Indonesian Cooking Kelepon I learn how to make Kelepon, rice flour dumplings filled with palm sugar syrup, at the New Treasure Island Cultural Center in Bali
http://www.associatedcontent.com/video/433647/cmn_video_indonesian_cooking_kelep

4. The Best Of Indonesian Cooking By Yasa Boga Group Staff
The Best of Indonesian Cooking is a compilation of authentic easyto-follow recipes from Indonesia with detailed descriptions of ingredients and cooking methods which enables
http://www.baliadvertiser.biz/articles/tokobuku/2008/indonesian_cooking.html
The Best of Indonesian Cooking by Yasa Boga Group Staff
The Best of Indonesian Cooking is a compilation of authentic easy-to-follow recipes from Indonesia with detailed descriptions of ingredients and cooking methods which enables readers to reproduce the flavors of the Spice Islands in the comfort of their own home.
Indonesian cuisine features a mixture of Chinese, Indian and European influences. This nation is strategically located at the crossroads of the ancient world, astride the great trade routes between the Middle East and Asia. Wave after wave of traders, adventurers, pirates and immigrants have been drawn by the riches of the archipelago and all have brought their native cuisines with them.
From India came curries, cucumber, eggplant and cowpeas. From the Americas, chili, pepper, vanilla, soursop, pawpaw and pineapple. The Chinese brought the wok and stir-fry, Chinese mustard, and such vegetables as brassica and cabbage. From Arabia were derived Middle Eastern gastronomic techniques and ingredients such as kebab and flavorful goat stews. Peanuts, avocado, pineapple, guava, papaya, tomato, squash, pumpkin, cacao, and soybeans were all introduced by Europeans.
If not prepared in the right hands, however, Indonesian food can be mediocre and lacking in variety, a constant and dreadful carbohydrate overload. After the culinary delights of Thailand, Malaysia, and Vietnam, the banality of ill-prepared Indonesian food can really bring you down to earth. This is where The Best of Indonesian Cooking comes in.

5. CMN Video: Indonesian Cooking - Kelepon - Video
CMN Video Indonesian Cooking Kelepon I learn how to make Kelepon, rice flour dumplings filled with palm sugar syrup, at the New Treasure Island Cultural Center in Bali
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/2649530/cmn_video_indonesian_cooking_kelepon/

6. The Rijsttafel Company
Joomla! Het dynamische portaal- en Content Management Systeem Rijsttafel, in English Ricetable, is that marvelous Indonesian feast savoured by the Colonial Dutch.
http://indonesiancooking.com/
Main Menu Home Products Order Recipes ... Contact Us Statistics Content View Hits
Who's Online We have 3 guests online Ricetable Rijsttafel, in English: Ricetable, is that marvelous Indonesian feast savoured by the Colonial Dutch. My sailor grandfather would spin tales of native cooks working the whole day preparing the 20 or more Sajours, (soup) Satays and Sambals.
From Batavia he not only brought us culinary delights, but also his favorite recipes so his family could enjoy the piquant blending of spices created in the East Indies.
Today, when I prepare our family's recipes from the fabled Spice Islands, my American friends urge me to share these fabulous taste secrets with them.
Encouraged by their enthusiasm, I have developed The Rijsttafel Company's line of classic Indonesian spice mixes which is now available in gourmet stores,
specialty food shops and now here on our web site.
By using my spice mixes and following the simple recipes available
I hope you too can share in the wonderful experience of far away places.

7. Sino-Indonesian Cooking
Flavor and Fortune, The Science and Art of Chinese Cuisine.
http://www.flavorandfortune.com/dataaccess/article.php?ID=64

8. Frank's Indonesian Cooking
Frank Rugebregt's Indonesian Cooking Recipes Indonesian Cooking. F. R UGEBREG T I hope that these recipes will help my American friends to
http://www.rugebregt.com/frank/IndonesianCooking.html
Rugebregt Frank / Indonesian Cooking
Indonesian Cooking
F. R UGEBREG T "I hope that these recipes will help my American friends to
prepare and enjoy Indonesian food."
Table of Contents
Introduction
I was born and raised in Indonesia. As a boy I liked to watch my mother in the kitchen prepare different dishes and I developed an interest in cooking. Sometimes I helped preparing the meat. In later years when I was older I still took pleasure in watching my mother cook and picked up more hints on preparing food. In the early fifties when we were in Holland and no ingredients were available at that time she told me different substitutes and shortcuts. Luckily that time is over and most of the ingredients are now readily available in many grocery stores in Holland as well as in America. Here on the West-coast of America and especially in California, the ingredients are even available fully prepared and packed ready to use in servings of four or six with complete instructions in English. There are mostly imported from Indonesia or Holland, and I have seen many Oriental grocery stores carry these items. I hope that the recipes in this pamphlet will help my American friends to prepare and enjoy Indonesian food Many Americans, especially the younger generations, could not tie Indonesia (a tropical country) to Holland or the Netherlands, a western European country. For those let me explain that for nearly 400 years Indonesia was a Dutch colony known as the Netherlands East Indies, and it was not until after World War II that it gained its independence when in 1945 president Soekarno proclaimed the Republic of Indonesia

9. Indonesian Cuisine - Recipes Wiki
Preparation Methods for Indonesian Cooking Edit. Most ingredients are sliced, chopped, or otherwise cut up into small pieces so they cook relatively quickly and are easy to eat in
http://recipes.wikia.com/wiki/Indonesian_Cuisine
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10. Discover Indonesia : Indonesian Cooking Home
A tasty and simple cuisine Indonesian cooking is mainly of the village. The combination of contrasting flavors, textures, and colors distinguishes the cuisine and unifies the
http://discover-indo.tierranet.com/indocook1.htm

11. Jakarta Cooking Class Jakarta Bed & Breakfast
Join our Indonesian cooking class in Jakarta, we’ll teach you authentic Indonesian cuisine! Indonesian cooking is a rich and complex blend of many cultures Dutch, Spanish
http://jakartabedandbreakfast.com/jakarta-cooking-class/
Jakarta Cooking Class
Join our Indonesian cooking class in Jakarta, we’ll teach you authentic Indonesian cuisine! Indonesian cooking is a rich and complex blend of many cultures: Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, and Middle Eastern. Proximity to other South East Asian countries has also strongly influenced the cuisines of Indonesia. If you enjoy chili peppers, peanut sauces and curries, lemon grass, turmeric and tamarind, then you will love Indonesian food. MENUS: Choose one set menu per class. Each one includes 3 courses, however, dishes can be modified (e.g. halal, vegetarian), please check with us prior to booking. VOUCHERS: Our Indonesian cooking course can also be a great idea as a gift to someone. Vouchers can be sent by email or by post. SCHEDULE: Approximately 3 to 4 hours. Monday to Saturday (subject to availability): 10 AM or even earlier if you want to do the local market tour. PRICE: Price per lesson is USD 50/person including local market tour and your own cooked lunch. Contact us at siska39@gmail.com, or Skype: Silitonga24. We can pick you up anywhere in Jakarta for additional $10.

12. Indochef.com :: Indonesian Food & Recipes
Large collection of recipes with menu suggestions and information on ingredients, by chef Henk Hardendood.
http://www.indochef.com/

13. Indonesian Cooking Kayotic Kitchen
Check out the Visual Recipe Index and browse up to 60 recipe thumbnails at a time.
http://www.kayotic.nl/blog/tag/indonesian-cooking
RSS June 19, 2010
Ketjap Manis
Filed under: Home Indonesian Food Recipes condiments ... sweet soy sauce The only thing I could do was try to come up with a homemade Ketjap version using ingredients that are readily available in most countries. Turned out to be so stupid simple that I feel plum silly for not doing this sooner. It’ll take you all of 15 minutes to create the best condiment in this world! Ingredients: 1/2 cup soy sauce
3 tbsp molasses
3 tbsp brown or palm sugar
1/4 red chili pepper
1 small garlic clove
fresh ginger (1” piece) Optional: water
Directions:
Finely mince the red chili pepper and garlic clove and transfer them to a sauce pan.

14. Indonesian Cooking Methods And Techniques For Asian Recipes
Indonesian cooking methods for asian recipes with links to information on food culture, cooking utensils, food history, herbs and country information and Chinese Medicine.
http://asiarecipe.com/indocook.html
Search for:
Cooking Methods
Indonesian Cooking Methods
Indonesian cooking methods are similar to those used in any other Asian or Western kitchen especially the basics such as blanching, broiling, steaming, frying and deep frying. However, there one important basic that you need to know how to prepare. It is how to prepare what is called the basic spice paste. There are varieties of basic spice pastes and they are called basic because they are the seasoning bases of almost all Indonesian dishes. In Indonesia, a saucer-shape granite grinding stone (mortar) and pestle are used. Ingredients are peeled as necessary and sometimes chopped or sliced into small pieces so they would be easier to grind. The pestle is used with a backwards and forwards motion across the mortar until the ingredients are blended together into a smooth paste. If you are using a blender or a food processor, the order of processing the spices is much the same as using a mortar, but in some cases you might need to add some liquid to keep the blades of the machine turning during the blending process. The liquid could be oil if the spice paste needs to be fried or either coconut milk, stock or water if the spice paste is to be simmered. The order to be followed when grinding spice paste ingredients is the hard items first although at most times I like to grind garlic and shallots first. The hard items are dried spices, nuts and tough fibrous rhizomes such as galangal, lemongrass. When all of these ingredients are fine, add softer rhizomes, such as turmeric, ginger and fresh soaked dried chilies. Once all of these are quite smooth, then add ingredients that are full of moisture, such as shallots and garlic. Finally, you add shrimp paste and tamarind juice or any other kind of juices and process to mix well.

15. Wheelchair Lift | Automotive
When our parents died when we were teenagers, I knew I’d have to grow up fast and help take care of my sister, Jess. She is a quadriplegic and has been using a wheelchair since
http://automotive.indonesian-cooking.com/tag/wheelchair-lift/
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Wheelchair Lift, a reliable companion to a wheelchair
Monday, October 12th, 2009 When our parents died when we were teenagers, I knew I’d have to grow up fast and help take care of my sister, Jess. She is a quadriplegic and has been using a wheelchair since her birth. Since i was her elder brother, I always had to care for her, but i never took it as chore since the reality is that she also cared for me. When i finally acquired my licence, jess was too happy. She said she’d never been anywhere seeing as how she was stuck in that chair, and now she wanted to see the world. I didn’t mind bit my kid sister tagging along with me most places I went. The only thing which gave me a tough time was loading and unloading that huge wheelchair of hers. It’s one of those motorize jobs and must weigh about a hundred pounds. Either that or i am not too strong. Anyway, of course I couldn’t say anything to Jess. But i begun to acquire a wheelchair lift straight away. Shopping for a  wheelchair lift is like shopping for anything else—you wouldn’t believe how many different models they have! There are basically two type of

16. Merry's Kitchen Of Indonesian Cuisine & Recipes - Cooking Methods
Indonesian cooking methods are similar to those used in any other Asian or Western kitchen especially the basics such as blanching, broiling, steaming, frying and deep
http://www.melroseflowers.com/mkic/cooking_methods.html
Indonesian cooking methods are similar to those used in any other Asian or Western kitchen especially the basics such as blanching, broiling, steaming, frying and deep frying. However, there one important basic that you need to know how to prepare. It is how to prepare what is called the basic spice paste. There are varieties of basic spice pastes and they are called basic because they are the seasoning bases of almost all Indonesian dishes. In Indonesia, a saucer-shape granite grinding stone (mortar) and pestle are used. Ingredients are peeled as necessary and sometimes chopped or sliced into small pieces so they would be easier to grind. The pestle is used with a backwards and forwards motion across the mortar until the ingredients are blended together into a smooth paste. If you are using a blender or a food processor, the order of processing the spices is much the same as using a mortar, but in some cases you might need to add some liquid to keep the blades of the machine turning during the blending process. The liquid could be oil if the spice paste needs to be fried or either coconut milk, stock or water if the spice paste is to be simmered. The order to be followed when grinding spice paste ingredients is the hard items first although at most times I like to grind garlic and shallots first. The hard items are dried spices, nuts and tough fibrous rhizomes such as galangal, lemongrass. When all of these ingredients are fine, add softer rhizomes, such as turmeric, ginger and fresh soaked dried chilies. Once all of these are quite smooth, then add ingredients that are full of moisture, such as shallots and garlic. Finally, you add shrimp paste and tamarind juice or any other kind of juices and process to mix well.

17. Indonesian Cooking Images And Stock Photos. 217 Indonesian Cooking Photography A
207 Indonesian cooking stock photos and images. Fotosearch Stock Photography and Stock Footage helps you find the perfect photo or footage, fast! We feature 7,500,000 royalty
http://www.fotosearch.com/photos-images/indonesian-cooking.html
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The World's Stock Photography - One Website ™ [24 hrs. M-F]
Indonesian cooking stock photos and images
217 images Images per page Image Size Small Large Page of 1 Sort by Relevance Price (Low to High) Price (High to Low) Recency Professional Images swap Budget Images $49 and up
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Gado-gado with peanut sauce (Indonesia) Food Collection
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RF Royalty Free Nasi goreng (Indonesia) Food Collection
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RF Royalty Free Bami Goreng with shrimps (Indonesia) Food Collection
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RF Royalty Free Chicken breast and shrimp on vegetables (Indonesia) Food Collection
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RF Royalty Free Bami Goreng with shrimps and chicken (Indonesia) Food Collection
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RF Royalty Free Spicy satay with sweet and sour chili sauce (Indonesia) Food Collection Add to Lightbox RF Royalty Free Fried zander on banana leaf (Indonesia) Food Collection Add to Lightbox RF Royalty Free Bami Goreng with shrimps (Indonesia) Food Collection Add to Lightbox RF Royalty Free Spicy satay with sweet and sour chili sauce (Indonesia) Food Collection Add to Lightbox RF Royalty Free Spicy satay with sweet and sour chili sauce (Indonesia) Food Collection Add to Lightbox RF Royalty Free Bami Goreng with shrimps and chicken (Indonesia) Food Collection Add to Lightbox RF Royalty Free Bami Goreng with shrimps and chicken (Indonesia) Food Collection Add to Lightbox

18. Indonesia Food Ingredients For Asian Cooking Recipes
Ginger (jahe) This pale creamy yellow root is a very important ingredient for Indonesian cooking. Always scrape the skin off fresh ginger before using
http://asiarecipe.com/indoingred.html
Search for: Cooking Ingredients Indonesian Ingredients Thanks to Merry's Kitchen :)
Basil, Lemon (daun kemangi)
Cup Leaves (daun mangkok) Peanuts (kacang tanah) Candlenut (tingkih/kemiri) ... Pandan Leaf (daun pandan) More to come.... Basil, Lemon (daun kemangi): A fragrant, lemon-scented herb added at the last minute to keep its flavor, or used as a grarnish. Although the flavor will be different, you can use another type of basil. Candlenut (tingkih/kemiri): A round, cream-colored nut with an oily consistency used to add texture and a faint flavor to many dishes. Substitute macadamia nuts or raw cashews. Cardamom (kapulaga): About 8-12 intenselu fragrant black seeds are enclosed in strawcolored, fibrous pod. Try to buy the whole pod instead of cardamom seeds or powder for maximum flavor, and bruise lightly with the back cleaver to break the pod before adding to seasonings. Celery (seledri): The celery used in Indonesia is somewhat different form the celery used in the Western world. It has a very slender stems and particularly pungent leaves. It is often referred to as "Chinese celery" abroad and is used as a herb rather than a vegetable.

19. Indonesia Cooks - Community - Allrecipes
The latest recipes, reviews, and food photos from Indonesia home cooks.
http://allrecipes.com/Cooks/Asia/South-Eastern-Asia/Indonesia/Main.aspx

20. Test Order Page
INCLUDES 2 Peanut Sauce Mixes 2 Fried Rice Mixes 2 Curry Mixes 2 Ginger Lemongrass Chicken Seasoning
http://www.indonesiancooking.com/order.html
Hostes gift Pack F or the goumet Cook 1 of each - Price $14.95
Shipping $3.95, $1.50 each additional INCLUDES:
1 Peanut Sauce Mixes
1 Fried Rice Mixes
1 Curry Mixes
1 Ginger Lemongrass Chicken Seasoning
1 Chicken or Seafood Seasoning Bouillabaisse Variety 10 Pack - Price $17.95
Shipping $3.95, $1.50 each additional INCLUDES:
2 Peanut Sauce Mixes
2 Fried Rice Mixes
2 Curry Mixes 2 Ginger Lemongrass Chicken Seasoning 2 Chicken or Seafood Seasoning Variety 6 Pack - Price $13.95 Shipping $3.50, $.50 each additional INCLUDES: 1 Peanut Sauce Mixes 1 Fried Rice Mixes 1 Curry Mixes 1 Ginger Lemongrass Chicken Seasoning 1 Chicken or Seafood Seasoning Bouillabaisse Mixes Bouillabaisse 5 Pack - Price $10.95 Shipping $3.50, $1.50 each additional 5 Packs - Price $9.95 Shipping $3.50, $.50 each additional Select Spice Type Peanut Sauce Mix Fried Rice Mix Curry Mix Ginger Lemongrass Chicken Seasoning Chicken or Seafood Seasoning 10 Packs - Price $17.95

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