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         Stowe Harriet Beecher:     more books (99)
  1. The Chimney corner by Harriet Beecher (1811-1896). Christopher Crowfield [pseud.] Stowe, 1868
  2. Dialogues And Scenes From The Writings Of Harriet Beecher Stowe
  3. Oldtown fireside stories by Harriet Beecher Stowe. by Stowe. Harriet Beecher. 1811-1896., 1872-01-01
  4. Life Of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Compiled From Her Letters And Journals
  5. My wife and I: or. Harry Henderson 's story. By Harriet Beecher by Stowe. Harriet Beecher. 1811-1896., 1871
  6. House And Home Papers
  7. My wife and I: or, Harry Hendersons history by Harriet Beecher (1811-1896) Stowe, 1971-01-01
  8. The Chimney Corner
  9. The May Flower, and Miscellaneous Writings by Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896 Stowe, 2010-07-28
  10. Negerhut: Het Slavenleven in Amerika, voor de Emancipatie by Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896 Stowe, 1896
  11. Biography - Stowe, Harriet (Elizabeth) Beecher (1811-1896): An article from: Contemporary Authors by Gale Reference Team, 2003-01-01
  12. Lady Byron vindicated: a history of the Byron controversy by Harriet Beecher Stowe 1811-1896, 1870-12-31
  13. The chimney-corner by Harriet Beecher Stowe 1811-1896, 1868-12-31
  14. De slavernij. Vervolg en sleutel op de Negerhut by Harriet Beecher Stowe 1811-1896, 1853-12-31

1. Harriet Beecher Stowe: Poems
Several poems by Harriet Beecher Stowe.
http://www.poetry-archive.com/s/stowe_harriet_beecher.html
POEMS BY HARRIET BEECHER STOWE: RELATED WEBSITES BROWSE THE POETRY ARCHIVE: A B C D ... Email Poetry-Archive.com

2. Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) American Writer.
(18111896) American writer. Harriet Beecher Stowe is best known for writing Uncle Tom's Cabin, in which she expresses her moral outrage at the institution of slavery and its
http://classiclit.about.com/od/stoweharriet/Stowe_Harriet_Beecher.htm
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  • (1811-1896) American writer. Harriet Beecher Stowe is best known for writing "Uncle Tom's Cabin," in which she expresses her moral outrage at the institution of slavery and its destructive effects on both whites and blacks.
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin - Stowe @
  • Books About Protest Literature
    Protest Literature has existed in different forms throughout literary history. Some of the greatest writers in history have employed their talents toward awakening the public to injustices locally and world-wide. zSB(3,3)
    Uncle Tom's Cabin
    Read the text for "Uncle Tom's Cabin," by Harriet Beecher Stowe.
    Uncle Tom's Cabin Quiz
    "Uncle Tom's Cabin" is a famous American novel. What happens in this book? And, why is the story so memorable? Test your knowledge about "Uncle Tom's Cabin."
    Book That Made The Great War
    Langston Hughes called "Uncle Tom's Cabin" America's "first protest novel." Harriet Beecher Stowe first published the novel in 1852, as an outcry against slavery after the Fugitive Slave Act was passed in 1850.
    Romantic Period Fiction - American Literature
    The Romantic Period originated in Germany. Writers like Wordsworth and Coleridge are famous Romantic writers in England. In American literature, famous writers like Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, and Nathaniel Hawthorne created fiction during the Romantic Period in the United States. Explore the American fiction from the Romantic Period.

    3. Welcome To The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center
    Introductory page for the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, a historic house museum in Hartford, CT
    http://www.harrietbeecherstowecenter.org/
    Welcome to the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center
    The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center preserves and interprets Stowe's Hartford home and the Center's historic collections, promotes vibrant discussion of her life and work, and inspires commitment to social justice and positive change. "There is more done with pens than swords" Stowe's best known novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), changed how Americans viewed the institution of slavery. It resonates with an international audience as a masterful literary work and protest novel. Uncle Tom's Cabin demanded that the United States deliver on the promise of freedom and equality, galvanized the abolition movement and contributed to the outbreak of the Civil War. The book was a runaway best-seller, selling 10,000 copies in the United States in its first week; 300,000 in the first year; and in Great Britain, 1.5 million copies in one year. Discover how Stowe's story can inspire YOU to action. Join Us On Facebook Follow Us On Twitter View Us On Flickr
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    Vote for Stowe Campaign!
    You can help us win a grant from Tourism Cares in an on-line voting competition....

    4. Harriet Beecher Stowe - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
    Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Uncle Tom’s Cabin. USA 1852. New York Barnes and Nobles Classics 2003. Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Letters; The Patent Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Mrs
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Beecher_Stowe
    Harriet Beecher Stowe
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation search This article may need to be rewritten entirely to comply with Wikipedia's quality standards You can help . The discussion page may contain suggestions. (April 2009) Harriet Beecher Stowe Born Harriet Elisabeth Beecher
    June 14, 1811
    Litchfield, Connecticut
    United States Died
    Hartford, Connecticut
    United States Pen name Christopher Crowfield Nationality American Genres Historical fiction Notable work(s) Uncle Tom's Cabin Spouse(s) Calvin Ellis Stowe Children Eliza Taylor, Harriet Beecher, Henry Ellis, Frederick William, Georgiana May, Samuel Charles, and Charles Edward Harriet Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author . Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) depicted life for African-Americans under slavery ; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom and made the political issues of the 1850s regarding slavery tangible to millions, energizing anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South . Upon meeting Stowe

    5. The Classic Text: Harriet Beecher Stowe
    H arriet Beecher Stowe was raised in a Puritan tradition of high moral standard and proselytization. Her father Lyman Beecher was a Congregational Minister and brother Henry Ward
    http://www4.uwm.edu/libraries/special/exhibits/clastext/clspg149.htm
    H arriet Beecher Stowe was raised in a Puritan tradition of high moral standard and proselytization. Her father Lyman Beecher was a Congregational Minister and brother Henry Ward Beecher became pastor of Brooklyn's Plymouth Church. The Beechers moved to Cincinatti when Lyman Beecher was appointed President of Lane Theological seminary. There, Harriet's sister Catharine founded Western Female Institute, where Harriet taught until her 1834 marriage to widower Calvin Stowe, a Biblical Literature professor at Lane. During the first seven years of marriage she bore five children, writing pieces for magazines to compliment Professor Stowe's meager salary. She won a short story prize from Western Monthly Magazine , and her literary production and skill increased steadily. In 1834, her short-story collection The Mayflower was published. T his Ohio period gave Stowe the impetus to write Uncle Tom's Cabin . Cincinnati was just across the river from the slave trade, and she observed firsthand several incidents which galvanized her to write famous anti-slavery novel. Scenes she observed on the Ohio River, including seeing a husband and wife being sold apart, as well as newspaper and magazine accounts and interviews, contributed material to the emerging plot. The family shared her abolitionist sentiment and was active in hiding runaway slaves. I n 1850 Calvin Stowe was appointed at Bowdoin, and the entire family returned to the Northeast. They reached Boston at the height of the public furor over the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, which mandated the return of runaway slaves already in the North to their owners. Many former slaves fled to Canada from their homes in New England. Harriet set about writing a polemical novel illustrating the moral responsibility of the entire nation for the cruel system. She forwarded the first episodes to Dr. Bailey, editor of the Washington anti-slavery weekly

    6. Stowe, Harriet Beecher - Definition From Longman English Dictionary Online
    Definition of Stowe, Harriet Beecher from the Longman Online Dictionary of Contemporary English. The Longman English Dictionary provides support and resources for those who
    http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/Stowe-Harriet-Beecher
    Stowe, Harriet Beecher
    Stowe, Harriet Beecher (1811-96) a US writer whose novel Uncle Tom's Cabin influenced many people in the US, especially in the North, to oppose slavery the system where black people were owned by white people and made to work for them . In the 20th century, the book was criticized for the way it shows the relationship between slaves and their owners, and the expression "Uncle Tom" is used in a disapproving way to describe a black person who is too eager to please white people. parent.curEntryId=41725; parent.prevEntryId=41724; parent.nextEntryId=41726; parent.gsSenseId=null; parent.giPhrId=null; Definition from the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Link to this entry: Dictionary pictures of the day Do you know what each of these is called? Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.
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    7. Uncle Tom's Cabin & American Culture
    University of Virginia multimedia archive.
    http://www.iath.virginia.edu/utc/

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    8. Harriet Beecher Stowe - Free Online Library
    Free Online Library books by Harriet Beecher Stowe best known authors and titles are available on the Free Online Library
    http://stowe.thefreelibrary.com/
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    18,320,800 articles and books Periodicals Literature Keyword Title Author Topic Member login User name Password Remember me Join us Forgot password? Submit articles free The Free Library ... Literature
    Harriet Beecher Stowe
    Harriet Beecher Stowe was born in Litchfield, Connecticut and brought up with puritanical strictness. She had one sister and six brothers. Her father, Lyman Beecher, was a controversial Calvinist preacher. Her mother, Roxana Foote, died at forty-one – when Stowe was four. Her aunt, Harriet Foote, deeply influenced Stowe's thinking, especially with her strong belief in culture. Samuel Foote, her uncle, encouraged her to read works of Lord Byron and Sir Walter Scott. When Stowe was eleven years old, she entered the seminary at Hartford, Connecticut, kept by her elder sister, Catherine. The school had advanced curriculum and she learned languages, natural and mechanical science, composition, ethics, logic, mathematics: subjects that were generally taught to male students. Four years later she was employed as an assistant teacher. Her father married again and became the president of Lane Theological Seminary. Catherine and Harriet founded a new seminary, the Western Female Institute. With her sister, Stowe wrote a children's geography book. In 1834 Stowe began her literary career when she won a prize contest of the

    9. Stowe, Harriet Beecher
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    JQ = $; //rename $ function Search data.nytimes.com About This Page Stowe, Harriet Beecher http://data.nytimes.com/N6868101714475644103 nyt:associated_article_count nyt:first_use nyt:latest_use nyt:number_of_variants ... skos:prefLabel - en Stowe, Harriet Beecher http://data.nytimes.com/N6868101714475644103.rdf cc:attributionName The New York Times Company cc:attributionURL http://data.nytimes.com/N6868101714475644103 cc:license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ ... dc:creator The New York Times Company dcterms:created dcterms:modified dcterms:rightsHolder The New York Times Company foaf:primaryTopic http://data.nytimes.com/N6868101714475644103 nyt:mapping_strategy http://data.nytimes.com/elements/manual New York Times Linked Open Data by The New York Times Company is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License

    10. Barbara & Douglas Smith: Third Floor Publishing - Literature Study - Harriet Bee
    Literature study.
    http://www.chfweb.com/smith/harriet.html

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    Harriet Beecher Stowe:
    A Little Bit of a Woman
    By Barbara Smith The woman credited with sparking the Civil War came to Christ at thirteen, during one of her fathers sermons. She wrestled throughout her eighty-five years with questions and spiritual conflicts for she endured grave trials: her mother died while Harriet was a very young child; her husband, though an erudite theologian, could not provide financially and suffered bouts of poor health; she lost four children tragically; and she enjoyed the acclaim of the rich and powerful of her generation. In spite of these upheavals, her basic faith in the Lord Jesus Christ held and sustained her. Harriet was born in Connecticut in 1811, the daughter of Lyman Beecher. He was a persuasive preacher, theologian, a founder of the American Bible Society who was active in the anti slavery movement, and the father of thirteen children. Her mother who died when Harriet was four years old, was a woman of prayer, asking the Lord to call her six sons into the ministry. All eventually preached; Henry Ward Beecher, the youngest son became the most prominent. After her mothers death, Harriet grew close to her sister, Catherine, teaching in her school and writing books with her soon after she turned thirteen. Harriet was brilliant and bookish, and idolized the poetry of Lord Byron. When her father became president of Lane Theological Seminary in Ohio, she moved with him and met Calvin Stowe a professor and clergyman who fervently opposed slavery. He was nine years her senior and the widower of a dear friend of hers, Eliza Tyler. Their subsequent marriage in 1836 was born of the common grief they shared. In later years, Mark Twains daughter Susy Clemens saw Calvin Stowe merrily reported to her father, Santa Clause has got loose.(

    11. Harriet Beecher Stowe
    Biographical information and a bibliography of works written by and about Harriet Beecher Stowe.
    http://www.digital.library.upenn.edu/women/stowe/StoweHB.html
    Harriet Beecher Stowe: 1811-1896
    See also: Bibliography Harriet Beecher was born June 14, 1811, the seventh child of a famous protestant preacher. Harriet worked as a teacher with her older sister Catharine: her earliest publication was a geography for children, issued under her sister's name in 1833. In 1836, Harriet married widower Calvin Stowe: they eventually had seven children. Stowe helped to support her family financially by writing for local and religious periodicals. During her life, she wrote poems, travel books, biographical sketches, and children's books, as well as adult novels. She met and corresponded with people as varied as Lady Byron, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and George Eliot. She died at the age of 85, in Hartford Conneticutt. While she wrote at least ten adult novels, Harriet Beecher Stowe is predominantly known for her first, Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852). Begun as a serial for the Washington anti-slavery weekly, the National Era , it focused public interest on the issue of slavery, and was deeply controversial. In writing the book, Stowe drew on her personal experience: she was familiar with slavery, the antislavery movement, and the underground railroad because Kentucky, across the Ohio River from Cincinnatti, Ohio, where Stowe had lived, was a slave state. Following publication of the book, she became a celebrity, speaking against slavery both in America and Europe. She wrote A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin (1853) extensively documenting the realities on which the book was based, to refute critics who tried to argue that it was inauthentic; and published a second anti-slavery novel

    12. Harriet Beecher Stowe
    Harriet Beecher Stower notes, links to information and all texts available on the web, information
    http://www.wsu.edu/~campbelld/amlit/stowe.htm
    Home Literary Movements Timeline American Authors ... American Literature Sites Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896)
    Brief Lecture Notes on
    Uncle Tom's Cabin Mothers in Uncle Tom ... 's America (1997). This site at the University of Virginia's Crossroads project contains images from the original publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin , definitions, background information about the cult of domesticity, and other materials.
    Extended primary and secondary bibliography on Stowe
    by Martha Henning at the Celebration of Women Writers site.
    Jane Tompkins's guide to teaching Stowe from the Heath Anthology site.
    Stowe and
    Uncle Tom's Cabin page at the University of Wisconsin (1997).
    A Matthew Brady photograph of Stowe and her two brothers, Henry Ward Beecher and Lyman Beecher, taken circa 1861. Photo courtesy of the Celebration of Women Writers Pag e Works Available Online Books Stories and Poems (HTML) Articles (Page images at MOA) Uncle Tom's Cabin The Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin (Boston: Jewett, 1854)

    13. Harriet Beecher Stowe - People Of Connecticut
    Vintage photograph, vital statistics and biographical information.
    http://www.netstate.com/states/peop/people/ct_hbs.htm
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    Harriet Beecher Stowe Born: June 14, 1811
    Place: Litchfield, Connecticut Died: July 1, 1896 Place: Hartford, Connecticut H arriet Elizabeth Beecher was born on June 14, 1811 in Litchfield, Connecticut. Her father, Reverend Lyman Beecher, was a Congregationalist preacher, and he was well known as a persuasive speaker who championed high moral standards. He did not hide his anti-slavery views from his congregation or his children. Harriet was one of Lyman Beecher's thirteen children. All of them, including Harriet, were brought up with strong moral principles, and all were expected to follow their religious upbringing throughout their lives, which they did. Her mother died when Harriet was four years old, and she developed a close bond with her older sister Catherine. Harriet attended school in Litchfield during these years, then studied under her sister Catherine, and then joined her sister as a teacher herself. I n 1832 both of the sisters moved to Cincinnati when their father was invited to be the president of Lane Theological Seminary there. The move was an eye-opener for Harriet. She witnessed the cruelty of slave auctions. She saw husbands, wives, and children sold to separate bidders. She saw fugitive slaves fleeing across the Ohio River from Kentucky, hoping to find refuge to the north in Canada. She drew upon several of these first-hand experiences when she later wrote the work that would make her famous, Uncle Tom's Cabin D

    14. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Definition Of Stowe, Harriet Beecher In The Free Online E
    Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811–96, American novelist and humanitarian, b. Litchfield, Conn. With her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, she stirred the conscience of Americans concerning
    http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Stowe, Harriet Beecher

    15. Stowe, Harriet Beecher - Encyclopedia Britannica - On History
    Full Name Harriet Beecher Stowe. Nationality American Activity American writer and educator. Born 1406-1811 Died 01-07-1896
    http://www.history.co.uk/encyclopedia/stowe-harriet-beecher.html

    16. The Classic Text: Harriet Beecher Stowe
    Biographical information.
    http://www4.uwm.edu/libraries/special/exhibits/clastext/clspg149.cfm
    H arriet Beecher Stowe was raised in a Puritan tradition of high moral standard and proselytization. Her father Lyman Beecher was a Congregational Minister and brother Henry Ward Beecher became pastor of Brooklyn's Plymouth Church. The Beechers moved to Cincinatti when Lyman Beecher was appointed President of Lane Theological seminary. There, Harriet's sister Catharine founded Western Female Institute, where Harriet taught until her 1834 marriage to widower Calvin Stowe, a Biblical Literature professor at Lane. During the first seven years of marriage she bore five children, writing pieces for magazines to compliment Professor Stowe's meager salary. She won a short story prize from Western Monthly Magazine , and her literary production and skill increased steadily. In 1834, her short-story collection The Mayflower was published. T his Ohio period gave Stowe the impetus to write Uncle Tom's Cabin . Cincinnati was just across the river from the slave trade, and she observed firsthand several incidents which galvanized her to write famous anti-slavery novel. Scenes she observed on the Ohio River, including seeing a husband and wife being sold apart, as well as newspaper and magazine accounts and interviews, contributed material to the emerging plot. The family shared her abolitionist sentiment and was active in hiding runaway slaves. I n 1850 Calvin Stowe was appointed at Bowdoin, and the entire family returned to the Northeast. They reached Boston at the height of the public furor over the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, which mandated the return of runaway slaves already in the North to their owners. Many former slaves fled to Canada from their homes in New England. Harriet set about writing a polemical novel illustrating the moral responsibility of the entire nation for the cruel system. She forwarded the first episodes to Dr. Bailey, editor of the Washington anti-slavery weekly

    17. Harriet Beecher Stowe Biography
    Harriet Beecher Stowe Image Donated by Corbis Bettmann . NAME Harriet Beecher Stowe BIRTHDATE June 14, 1811
    http://www.lkwdpl.org/wihohio/stow-har.htm
    Harriet Beecher Stowe
    Image Donated by Corbis - Bettmann NAME: Harriet Beecher Stowe BIRTHDATE: June 14, 1811 BIRTHPLACE: Litchfield, CT EDUCATION: Educated at and subsequently taught at the Hartford Female Academy, founded by her sister Catherine Beecher in 1823. She also taught at the Western Female Institute in Cincinnati, established by Catherine in 1832. FAMILY BACKGROUND: Harriet was the seventh child of Roxana and Lyman Beecher, a famous Congregationalist minister. Her brother, Henry Ward Beecher, became a renowned preacher and leader of the abolitionist movement. Her sister Catherine was instrumental in furthering educational opportunities for women. She married the widower Calvin Stowe in 1836; they had seven children. DESCRIPTION OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Her most famous work was Uncle Tom's Cabin, which she wrote in 1850. The book opened up the realities of slavery to the entire world. It became a best seller which has never been out of print. DATE OF DEATH: July 1, 1896.

    18. Stowe Harriet Beecher Books
    Stowe harriet beecher Read more about Stowe harriet beecher here!
    http://www.chhs.org/stowe harriet beecher.html
    Books about Stowe harriet beecher from Amazon.com
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    19. Queer Little Folks By Harriet Beecher Stowe - Project Gutenberg
    Etext at Project Gutenberg.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/2486
    Main Page Mobile Version Search Start Page Offline Catalogs My Bookmarks ... Donate to PG
    Queer Little Folks by Harriet Beecher Stowe
    Bibliographic Record
    Author Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896 Title Queer Little Folks Language English LoC Class QL: Science: Zoology Subject Animals Fiction Subject Animals, Legends and stories of Subject Animals Folklore Category Text EBook-No. Release Date Jan 1, 2001 Public domain in the USA. Downloads
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    20. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Legal Definition Of Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Stowe, Harrie
    Harriet Beecher Stowe. NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION. Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of one of America's most famous and popular books, helped to strengthen the
    http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Stowe, Harriet Beecher

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