Geometry.Net - the online learning center
Home  - Physics - Electromagnetism
e99.com Bookstore
  
Images 
Newsgroups
Page 1     1-20 of 103    1  | 2  | 3  | 4  | 5  | 6  | Next 20

         Electromagnetism:     more books (100)
  1. The Body Electric: Electromagnetism and the Foundation of Life by Robert Becker, Gary Selden, 1998-08-05
  2. Problems and Solutions on Electromagnetism (Major American Universities Ph.D. Qualifying Questions and Solutions)
  3. Electromagnetism by John C. Slater, Nathaniel H. Frank, 2011-02-17
  4. Physics Formulas and Tables: Classical Mechanics, Heat, Gas, Thermodynamics, Electromagnetism, Optics, Atomic Physics, Physical Constants, Symbols & more. ... chapters in demo (Mobi Study Guides) by MobileReference, 2007-06-20
  5. Classical Electromagnetism by Jerrold Franklin, 2005-03-03
  6. Electromagnetism by Gerald Pollack, Daniel Stump, 2001-10-12
  7. Maxwell's Equations and the Principles of Electromagnetism (Physics) (Physics (Infinity Science Press)) by Richard Fitzpatrick, 2008-01-28
  8. The Ankh: African Origin of Electromagnetism by Nur Ankh Amen, 1999-05
  9. Electromagnetism, 2E by I. S. Grant, W. R. Phillips, 1991-01
  10. Principles of electricity and electromagnetism (International series in pure and applied physics) by Gaylord Probasco Harnwell, 1949
  11. Electromagnetism and Life by Robert O. Becker, 1982-06-30
  12. Topological Foundations of Electromagnetism (World Scientific Series in Contemporary Chemical Physics) by Terence W. Barrett, 2008-03-13
  13. Basic Electromagnetism and Materials by André Moliton, 2010-11-02
  14. Thomas Edison: And the Developers of Electromagnetism (Mission: Science Biographies) by Elizabeth R. Cregan, 2009-08-15

1. HowStuffWorks "How Electromagnets Work"
Here's a fast, easy way to experience the power of electromagnetism. This electromagnet is comprised of 2 coils, a Utype iron core and an armature.
http://www.howstuffworks.com/electromagnet.htm

2. MSci Electromagnetism : Lecture Notes
Lecture notes introduce the essential elements of classical electromagnetism, covering Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, radiation and scattering, and the Lorentz
http://monopole.ph.qmw.ac.uk/~bill/emt/LecNotes.html
Lecture Notes
The following notes (in PDF format) summarise the course. More detailed discussion of this material will be presented in the lectures, and the course of the lectures may not follow exactly that of the notes. Lecture Notes 7 and 8 will be covered in one week. There may be some revision of these notes during the 2008/9 course in order to match the lectures more closely.
Lecture Notes 1
: Historical background, vector calculus, Maxwell's equations, energy and momentum. Magnetic monopoles.
Lecture Notes 2
: Linear media, polarisation and magnetisation, Maxwell's equations in matter, boundary conditions, energy and momentum, the Clausius-Mossotti relation, solved problems.
Lecture Notes 3
: Plane waves, polarisation, dispersion, the Kramers-Kronig relations.
Lecture Notes 4
: Scalar and vector potentials, the inhomogeneous wave equation, the delta function, the Green function.
Lecture Notes 5
: Radiation from a generalised localised source, electric dipole radiation, magnetic dipole radiation and higher order terms, radiation from an antenna.
Lecture Notes 6
: Scattering, scattering from a small scatterer, many scatterers, scattering from the sky, the Born approximation, Rayleigh's explanation for the blue sky, critical opalescence, the optical theorem.

3. Electromagnetism - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
electromagnetism is one of the four fundamental interactions of nature. The other three are the strong interaction, the weak interaction and gravitation.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetism
Electromagnetism
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation search Electromagnetism Electricity Magnetism Electrostatics Electric charge ... Electromagnetic four-potential Scientists Ampère Coulomb Faraday Gauss ... e Electromagnetism is one of the four fundamental interactions of nature. The other three are the strong interaction , the weak interaction and gravitation . Electromagnetism is the force that causes the interaction between electrically charged particles; the areas in which this happens are called electromagnetic fields Electromagnetism is responsible for practically all the phenomena encountered in daily life, with the exception of gravity. Ordinary matter takes its form as a result of intermolecular forces between individual molecules in matter. Electromagnetism is also the force which holds electrons and protons together inside atoms , which are the building blocks of molecules. This governs the processes involved in chemistry , which arise from interactions between the electrons orbiting atoms. Electromagnetism manifests as both electric fields and magnetic fields . Both fields are simply different aspects of electromagnetism, and hence are intrinsically related. Thus, a changing electric field generates a magnetic field; conversely a changing magnetic field generates an electric field. This effect is called

4. Electromagnetism
Encyclopedia information on electromagnetism electromagnetism. electromagnetism is a scientific concept which describes the magnetism that an electric current produces.
http://www.iscid.org/encyclopedia/Electromagnetism
ISCID Encyclopedia of Science and Philosophy BETA Make Entry Become an Editor Most Popular: ( Help
Electromagnetism Electromagnetism is a scientific concept which describes the magnetism that an electric current produces. It is also a branch of physics that is focused on the study of the electromagnetic field produced by the combination of the magnetic field and the electric field that encompass all of space. Electric fields are produced by electric charges that are static, while magnetic fields are produced by electric charges that are in motion.
The electromagnetic field exerts a force on electrically charged particles. That force is referred to as the electromagnetic force and is one of the fundamental forces that affect the universe, the other ones being strong nuclear force, weak nuclear force and gravitational force. These forces are the foundation from which any other form of force originates. Electromagnetism gets special mention, however, since it is affects interactions between atoms.
Electromagnetism can be traced back to the 17th century, when it was first understood that magnetism and electricity were distinct concepts. But the theory as it is known today was developed over the years of the 19th century, concluding with what is now referred to as classical electromagnetism, guided by the equations referred to as Maxwells equations.

5. VRML Gallery Of Electromagnetism (by Rob Salgado)
Visualization of the electromagnetic field.
http://physics.syr.edu/courses/vrml/electromagnetism/
/courses/vrml/electromagnetism/
Module Content Last modified: 12 Oct 1996
Homepage Last modified: Sat Aug 18 17:50:07 2001
VRML Browser links updated: Apr 27 2006 VRML 2.0 VRML 1.0-gz VRML 1.0
VRML Gallery of Electromagnetism
Rob Salgado
(salgado@physics.syr.edu)
Ampere's Law anim (255 kb)
Assorted anim
(940 kb)
A line-integral
(166 kb)
These pages are some of my attempts to visualize the vector fields (actually differential forms) of electromagnetism. These images are inspired by the works of the authors in my references. i have updated these links These visualizations require a
VRML-enabled browser. more VRML browsers
best viewed with
CosmoPlayer information from Karmanaut

CosmoPlayer at NIST

CosmoPlayer installation advice
or WorldView or Blaxxun or Cortona or my new favorite:
GLView
(Mac: Zaptech BeOS: Breeze Linux et al... build your own: OVAL With help from Sun's Java3D
Try this new Shout3D version of my Electric Dipole
Since September 30, 1996, you are visitor number

6. Electromagnetism
You are viewing the html version of Simple Nature, by Benjamin Crowell. This version is only designed for casual browsing, and may have some formatting problems.
http://www.lightandmatter.com/html_books/0sn/ch11/ch11.html
You are viewing the html version of Simple Nature , by Benjamin Crowell. This version is only designed for casual browsing, and may have some formatting problems. For serious reading, you want the printer-friendly Adobe Acrobat version Table of Contents (c) 1998-2009 Benjamin Crowell, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license . Photo credits are given at the end of the Adobe Acrobat version. Contents
Section 11.1 - More About the Magnetic Field

Section 11.2 - Magnetic Fields by Superposition

Section 11.5 - Induced Electric Fields

Section 11.6 - Maxwell's Equations
...
Section 11.7 - Electromagnetic Properties of Materials
Chapter 11. Electromagnetism
Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfill. Matthew 5:17
11.1 More About the Magnetic Field
a / The pair of charged particles, as seen in two different frames of reference. b / A large current is created by shorting across the leads of the battery. The moving charges in the wire attract the moving charges in the electron beam, causing the electrons to curve. c / A charged particle and a current, seen in two different frames of reference. The second frame is moving at velocity

7. Electromagnetism - Succeed In Understanding Physics: School For Champions
Explanation of how electromagnetism is created Succeed in Understanding Physics School for Champions
http://www.school-for-champions.com/science/electromagnetism.htm
Where you gain knowledge, confidence and success
Electricity and Magnetism topics
Electrical Charges Basics of Electricity Electricity Resources
Static Electricity
Basics of Static Electricity Static Electricity Forces Causes of Static Electricity Electrostatic Induction ... Uses for Static Electricity
DC Electricity
Direct Current (DC) Electricity Direct Current (DC) Electrical Circuits Ohm's Law for Electrical Circuits
AC Electricity
Alternating Current (AC) Electricity Alternating Current (AC) Transformers Worldwide AC Voltages and Frequencies AC Home Wiring ... Electrical Power
Magnetism
Magnetism Magnets Detection of a Magnetic Field Factors Determining Magnetic Response ... Magnetism and Lorentz Force
Electromagnetism
Basics of Electromagnetism Generating Electrical Current Electromagnetic Devices SfC Home ... Physics Explanation of how Electromagnetism is created - Succeed in Understanding Physics. Also refer to physical science, magnetism, electromagnet, magnet, electricity, electrons, AC, DC, forces, compass, poles, iron, battery, Tesla, gauss, Ron Kurtus, School for Champions.
Electromagnetism
by Ron Kurtus (revised 3 April 2005) electromagnet By wrapping insulated wire around a piece of iron and then running electrical current through the wire, the iron becomes magnetized. This happens because a magnetic field is created around a wire when it has electrical current running through it. Creating a coil of wire concentrates the field. Wrapping the wire around an iron core greatly increases the strength of the magnetic field.

8. Greenwich Public Schools: Electromagnetism WebQuest
electromagnetism WebQuest Greenwich
http://www.greenwichschools.org/page.cfm?p=3170

9. Electromagnetism: Definition From Answers.com
n. Magnetism produced by electric charge in motion. The physics of electricity and magnetism.
http://www.answers.com/topic/electromagnetism

10. Electromagnetism | Universe Today
The short version electromagnetism is one of the four fundamental forces (the strong force, the weak force, and gravitation are the other three), responsible
http://www.universetoday.com/51153/electromagnetism/

11. Electromagnetism - Simple English Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
electromagnetism is the study of the electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field pushes or pulls anything that has an electric charge. The electromagnetic field affects all of
http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetism
Electromagnetism
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation search The English used in this article or section may not be easy for everybody to understand.
You can help Wikipedia by making this page or section simpler
Electromagnetism is the study of the electromagnetic field . The electromagnetic field pushes or pulls anything that has an electric charge . The electromagnetic field affects all of space
Contents
change Electric field
An electric field is an area where charged particles will feel an electric force. The units used to measure electric fields are newtons per coulomb. Electromagnetism is closely related to both electricity and magnetism because both involve movement of electrons. Electric fields can be drawn as arrows. The arrows point which way a positive particle, like a proton , will be pushed if it's in the field. Negative particles, like electrons , will go in the opposite direction as the arrows. In an electric field, arrows will point away from positive particles, and towards negative ones. So, a proton in an electric field would move away from another proton, or towards an electron.
change Magnetic field
A magnetic field is a part of the electric field that only exerts a force on moving charges
change Electromagnetic field
Through electromagnetic induction, a changing magnetic field can produce an electric field. This

12. Electromagnetism Science Fair Projects & Experiments
electromagnetism science fair projects and experiments topics, ideas, resources, and sample projects.
http://www.juliantrubin.com/fairprojects/electricity/electromagnetism.html
Science Fair Projects Home Electro Sciences Experiments Electricity Fair Books Electronics Science Fair Projects ... Warning!
Electromagnetism
Science Fair Projects and Experiments
Topics, Ideas, Resources and Sample Projects
For Primary, Elementary, Middle and High School Students
Science Fair Projects Home
Electrical Sciences Electromagnetism
Electricity Science Fair Projects Home

  • Fruit Batteries
  • Bulbs
  • Electric Circuits ...
    Primary School
    - Grades K R =Reference/Experiment S =Sample Project How Electromagnets Work S Electric Motor and Generator Science Fair Projects Magnetic Levitation and Propulsion and Maglev Train Science Fair Projects Elementary School - Grades R =Reference/Experiment S =Sample Project How does the strength of the magnetic field change as the number of turns in the coil is increased? R Test if the number of turns of wire will affect the amount of electricity in a circuit (induction). R What factors determine the strength of an electromagnet? R R R R ... R Build a simple telegraph set? R R How do loudspeakers work? S Electric Motor and Generator Science Fair Projects Magnetic Levitation and Propulsion and Maglev Train Science Fair Projects Middle School - Grades R =Reference/Experiment S =Sample Project The relationship between coil and core length to achieve maximum velocity for electromagnetic accelerator applications.
  • 13. Sketching The History Of Classical Electromagnetism
    Timeline of classical electromagnetism, including essays on main milestones in optics, magnetism, and electricity for the period of 300BC and up to the 20th century.
    http://history.hyperjeff.net/electromagnetism
    Sketching the History of Classical Electromagnetism
    (Optics, Magnetism, Electricity, Electromagnetism) HyperJeff Network
    History
    Philosophy OSX ... Blog Anti-
    quity Many things are known about optics: the rectilinearity of light rays; the law of reflection; transparency of materials; that rays passing obliquely from less dense to more dense medium is refracted toward the perpendicular of the interface; general laws for the relationship between the apparent location of an object in reflections and refractions; the existence of metal mirrors (glass mirrors being a 19 th century invention). th
    cent
    BC Empedocles (b. ca. 492 BC) speculates (based on reason) that the speed of light is finite. ca
    BC Convex lenses in existence at Carthage. Euclid of Alexandria writes, among many other works, Optics and Catoptrica , dealing with vision theory and perspective. st
    cent
    BC Chinese fortune tellers begin using loadstone to construct their divining boards, eventually leading to the first compasses. (Mentioned in Wang Ch'ung's Discourses weighed in the balance of 83 B.C.)

    14. Hila - Electromagnetism
    Background A magnet is a device with the ability to attract iron*, cobalt and nickel. One end of a magnet is attracted to the earth's north pole, this end of the magnet is called its
    http://hilaroad.com/camp/projects/magnet.html
    Hila Science Camp - Technology Projects Electromagnetism
    Background:
    A magnet is a device with the ability to attract iron*, cobalt and nickel . One end of a magnet is attracted to the earth's north pole, this end of the magnet is called its north pole . The other end of the magnet is called its south pole . The opposite poles of two magnets attract , the like poles of two magnets repel * (Magnets are attracted to steel because the main component of steel is iron.) Electricity is a flow of atomic particles called electrons . Electrons will flow easily through most metals. Electrons travel from the minus end of a battery and are attracted to the plus end. Electrons traveling through a wire, create a weak magnetic field around the wire. Electrons traveling through wire, coiled around an iron nail cause the nail to become a magnet. This device is called an electromagnet. PROJECT #1: Build an electromagnet
    The elastic band holds each end of the wire against the battery terminals.
    Only use a 1.5 volt AA battery with this electromagnet.
    Only remove the insulating enamel from the last 1 cm of the wire.

    15. Electromagnetism
    General electromagnetic theory, including static field equations, the origins of inductance, and EMR.
    http://www.mariner.connectfree.co.uk/html/electromagnetism.html
    Electromagnetism Home
    Electromagnetic Inertia Have you ever thought If an electron induces a magnetic field when it moves, and magnetic fields contains energy, where does the energy to create this field come from? Click here to find out more about Electromagnetic Inertia.
    Electrostatic Potential Energy
    The starting point for all electrostatic interactions is that between two point electric charges such as two electrons, or between a positron and an electron. In the 19th century scientists did not understand the interaction, and invented the concept of potential energy to provide the force that drove these particles together or apart. It was only when Einstein developed the equivalence of mass and energy that the true source of the energy became apparent. You are probably familiar with the concept that electric fields contain energy and it is the interaction between the fields of the two charges that leads to changes in their energy and hence to the forces between them, energy being simply the integral of force over distance. This paper develops the equations for the interaction at any point in space near the charges, without recourse to potential energy. Click here to view the paper on electrostatic fields and the associated potential energy.

    16. Electromagnetism (physics) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia
    electromagnetism (physics), science of charge and of the forces and fields associated with charge. Electricity and magnetism are two aspects of electromagnetism.
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/183324/electromagnetism
    document.write(''); Search Site: With all of these words With the exact phrase With any of these words Without these words Home CREATE MY electromagne... NEW ARTICLE ... SAVE
    electromagnetism
    Table of Contents: electromagnetism Article Article Fundamentals Fundamentals - Principle of charge conservation Principle of charge conservation - Electric fields and forces Electric fields and forces - Magnetic fields and forces Magnetic fields and forces - Interaction of a magnetic field with ... Interaction of a magnetic field with a charge Effects of varying magnetic fields Effects of varying magnetic fields - Self-inductance and mutual inductance Self-inductance and mutual inductance Effects of varying electric fields Effects of varying electric fields Historical survey Historical survey - Early observations and applications Early observations and applications - Emergence of the modern sciences of e...

    17. Electromagnetism (physics) :: Principle Of Charge Conservation -- Britannica Onl
    electromagnetism (physics), Principle of charge conservation, Britannica Online Encyclopedia, Like Coulomb’s law, the principle of charge conservation is a fundamental law of
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/183324/electromagnetism/71587/Principl
    document.write(''); Search Site: With all of these words With the exact phrase With any of these words Without these words Home CREATE MY electromagne... NEW ARTICLE ... SAVE
    electromagnetism
    Table of Contents: electromagnetism Article Article Fundamentals Fundamentals - Principle of charge conservation Principle of charge conservation - Electric fields and forces Electric fields and forces - Magnetic fields and forces Magnetic fields and forces - Interaction of a magnetic field with ... Interaction of a magnetic field with a charge Effects of varying magnetic fields Effects of varying magnetic fields - Self-inductance and mutual inductance Self-inductance and mutual inductance Effects of varying electric fields Effects of varying electric fields Historical survey Historical survey - Early observations and applications Early observations and applications - Emergence of the modern sciences of e...

    18. Electromagnetism - Engineering
    electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field a field, encompassing all of space, which exerts a force on those particles that possess a property known as electric
    http://engineering.wikia.com/wiki/Electromagnetism
    Wikia
    Skip to Content Skip to Wiki Navigation Skip to Site Navigation
    Wikia Navigation

    19. Electromagnetism
    electromagnetism is one of the four fundamental interactions of nature. The other three are the strong interaction, the weak interaction and gravitation.
    http://plumbot.com/Electromagnetism.html

    20. Maxwell's Equations - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
    It is the addition of displacement current that is the most significant aspect of Maxwell's work in electromagnetism, as it enabled him to later derive the electromagnetic wave
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell's_equations
    Maxwell's equations
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation search For thermodynamic relations, see Maxwell relations Electromagnetism Electricity Magnetism ... Displacement current Maxwell's equations EM field Electromagnetic radiation Liénard–Wiechert potential Maxwell tensor ... Electromagnetic four-potential Scientists Ampère Coulomb Faraday Gauss ... e Maxwell's equations are a set of four partial differential equations describing how the electric and magnetic fields relate to their sources, charge density and current density , and how they develop with time. Thus, these equations are of basic importance for the totality of physical and electrotechnical phenomena, concerning the fields of classical electrodynamics, classical optics, and the present radio-, television-, phone-, and information-technologies. The equations are named after the Scottish physicist and mathematician James Clerk Maxwell who first published essentially the same equations in 1861. Individually, the equations are known as Gauss's law Gauss's law for magnetism Faraday's law of induction , and Ampère's law with Maxwell's correction . Often, two equations for the electromagnetic field tensor that give an equivalent relativistic formulation are also called the Maxwell equations. Furthermore, there is also a formulation with one differential two-form and its dual.

    Page 1     1-20 of 103    1  | 2  | 3  | 4  | 5  | 6  | Next 20

    free hit counter