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         Archaeoastronomy:     more books (103)
  1. Exploring Ancient Skies: An Encyclopedic Survey of Archaeoastronomy by David H. Kelley, Eugene F. Milone, 2004-11-19
  2. Mysteries and Discoveries of Archaeoastronomy: From Giza to Easter Island by Giulio Magli, 2009-04-28
  3. Archaeoastronomy in the Americas (Ballena Press Anthropological Papers)
  4. Archaeoastronomy in the Old World by D. C. Heggie, 2009-12-17
  5. Ethnoastronomy & Archaeoastronomy in the American Tropics (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, V. 385)
  6. Archaeoastronomy in the New World: American Primitive Astronomy
  7. Archaeoastronomy of southeast Colorado and the Oklahoma Panhandle by William R McGlone, 1999
  8. African Cultural Astronomy: Current Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy research in Africa (Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings)
  9. East-Asian Archaeoastronomy: Historical Records of Astronomical Observations of China, Japan and Korea (Earth Space Institute Book Series) by Zhenoao Xu, W. Pankenier, et all 2000-11-17
  10. Archaeoastronomy: Skywatching in the Native American Southwest (Plateau (Flagstaff, Ariz. : 1939), Vol. 63, No. 2,) by Ronald McCoy, 1994-03
  11. The Petroglyph Calendar: An Archaeoastronomy Adventure by Hubert A. Jr. Allen, 2001-03-01
  12. Archaeoastronomy in Pre-Columbian American
  13. Archaeoastronomy and the Roots of Science (Aaas Selected Symposium, 71)
  14. World Archaeoastronomy: Selected Papers from the 2nd Oxford International Conference on Archaeoastronomy Held at Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, 13-17 January 1986

1. Ligustic Archaeoastronomy
Ligurian archaeoastronomy, mainly in Italian but with some English and German translations.
http://www.archaeoastronomy.it/index2.htm

2. Cloudbait Observatory Archaeoastronomy
Well developed site featuring articles and photographs on a number of significant sites and their archaeoastronomy
http://www.cloudbait.com/archaeoastronomy.html
Archaeoastronomy We can assume that people have been observing the stars for as long as we have had minds enough to wonder. Throughout most of history there have been two reasons that people looked to the heavens: as a tool for predicting seasonal events such as planting and harvest times, and as a source of spiritual guidance and mythological explanation. Rare elements of true science have occasionally shown up, for example in ancient Greece, but it is only in the last few hundred years that we can really say that astronomy has become a science in the modern sense. Sadly, we still live in a world of irrational people who are prepared to believe in astrology and other nonsense. For these people, I have only sympathy that they have given up the very essence of what makes us human: our ability to reason. For our ancestors, who didn't know better, I give credit for the observations and discoveries that were made and which contributed to our knowledge today. When I travel, I always enjoy visiting sites with some historic astronomical significance, and I share here some of those places.
British
Aztec
Egyptian
American Indian
Indian
Mayan Chris L Peterson

3. Archaeoastronomy Pages By James Q. Jacobs
Links to all ancient astronomy related articles by James Q. Jacobs. Covers many cultures. Includes a bibliography and photos.
http://www.jqjacobs.net/astro/archaeoastronomy.html
Archaeoastronomy ESSAYS AND REFERENCES Temporal Epoch Calculations
So-called astronomical "constants," such as days per year, are in fact temporally variable.... Mesoamerican
Archaeoastronomy
The Aryabhatiya of Aryabhata
The oldest exact astronomic constant? Miami Circle
Archaeogeodesy
Archaeogeodesy Pages Part 1 ... Part 4 "Archaeogeodesy can be defined as that area of study encompassing prehistoric and ancient place determination, point positioning, astronomy, geodynamic phenomena, measure and representation of the earth, and navigation ..." Astronomy Formulas, Page One Astronomical Constants Ekonk Hill Petroglyph Site Astronomy Formulas, Page Two ... Geodesy Page SPREADSHEET DOWNLOADS ArchaeoGeodesy
Arc distances and bearings
for three sites, with mounds, pyramids

4. Archaeoastronomy, University Of Texas Press
The journal produced by the Center for archaeoastronomy on an annual basis. Published by University of Texas Press.
http://www.utexas.edu/utpress/journals/jarch.html
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Archaeoastronomy
The Journal of Astronomy in Culture
The Journal of the Center for Archaeoastronomy
Editor: John B. Carlson, Director
Co-Editors: David S. P. Dearborn, Clive L. N. Ruggles, Stephen McCluskey, Stanislaw Iwaniszewski
Book Review Editor: Stephen McCluskey, Department of History, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 The Journal of The Center for Archaeoastronomy and ISAAC, the International Society for Archaeoastronomy and Astronomy in Culture . The Center is an independent foundation created to advance research, education, and public awareness of archaeoastronomy, including ethnoastronomy; and to promote archaeoastronomy as a discipline within the sciences, the arts, and the humanities. Also available is the online companion publication, on the website of The Center for Archaeoastronomy. provides the latest news in archaeoastronomy, including conference notices, new books and web sites, as well as forthcoming events from the Center and ISAAC. Submission Guidelines Volume XXI, 2007-2008

5. Archaeoastronomy Pinpoints Equinox, Solstice And Cross Quarter Moments Throughou
Overview of archaeoastronomy. Includes maps, almanacs and video archive.
http://archaeoastronomy.com/
Archaeoastronomy Spotlights the Dawn of Human History documentary
US Naval Obs.

Big Bear Solar O.

Don't Fear the 2012 Reaper!
Celebrated archaeoastronomy author Martin Brennan assures a Winter Solstice audience Mayan inscriptions do NOT forecast Earth's last days. What will Hollywood do? Please see our new ALMANACS now extending through 2020.
Blessings of summer's sun!
Old News DVD

my.onter.net/today.html
2010 seasonal cusps in GMT, Greenwich Mean Time, for Northern Hemisphere
Earth's annual orbit is The Master Clock because the common yardstick of our lives is the year . Years are divided by the seasons just as calendars are segmented by months. Mechanical and digital timepieces measure intervals that split into hours, minutes and seconds each spin of our planet on its axis. Yet, it is the earth's regular, rhythmic loop around the sun that standardizes our timeframe of reference, regardless of geographic distances separating us from our acquaintances or generational distances separating us from our ancestors.
Our planet moves around the sun in an elliptical circuit deviating less than a second from one year to the next. Together we proceed through 8 significant, yet invisible, thresholds within each orbit. These spatial milestones mark the beginning, midpoint and end of each of our seasons.

6. Ancient Stars: Rock Art And Archaeo-astronomy
archaeoastronomy (from http//archaeoastronomy.wordpress.com/archaeoastronomy/) archaeoastronomy (also spelled Archeoastronomy) is the study of ancient or
http://www3.villanova.edu/anthro/stars/
Archaeoastronomy (from http://archaeoastronomy.wordpress.com/archaeoastronomy/)
Archaeoastronomy (also spelled Archeoastronomy) is the study of ancient or traditional astronomies in their cultural context, utilizing archaeological and anthropological evidence. It is closely associated with sister disciplines Ethnoastronomy, the study of astronomical practice in contemporary societies and Historical Astronomy , the use of historical records of heavenly events to answer astronomical problems. Another similar discipline is History of Astronomy which uses written records to evaluate prior astronomical traditions. It is most frequently mentioned with astronomical claims regarding Stonehenge or the pyramids of Egypt
History of Archaeoastronomy
Archaeoastronomy is arguably almost as old as archaeology itself.

7. Archaeoastronomy - Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
archaeoastronomy (also spelled archeoastronomy) is the study of how past people have understood the phenomena in the sky, how they used phenomena in the sky and what role the
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeoastronomy
Archaeoastronomy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation search The rising Sun illuminates the inner chamber of Newgrange Ireland , only at the winter solstice Archaeoastronomy (also spelled archeoastronomy ) is the study of how past people "have understood the phenomena in the sky, how they used phenomena in the sky and what role the sky played in their cultures Clive Ruggles argues it is misleading to consider archaeoastronomy to be the study of ancient astronomy , as modern astronomy is a scientific discipline, while archaeoastronomy considers other cultures' symbolically rich cultural interpretations of phenomena in the sky. It is often twinned with ethnoastronomy , the anthropological study of skywatching in contemporary societies. Archaeoastronomy is also closely associated with historical astronomy , the use of historical records of heavenly events to answer astronomical problems and the history of astronomy , which uses written records to evaluate past astronomical practice. Archaeoastronomy uses a variety of methods to uncover evidence of past practices including archaeology, anthropology, astronomy, statistics and probability, and history. Because these methods are diverse and use data from such different sources, the problem of integrating them into a coherent argument has been a long-term issue for archaeoastronomers. Archaeoastronomy fills complementary niches in landscape archaeology and cognitive archaeology . Material evidence and its connection to the sky can reveal how a wider landscape can be integrated into beliefs about the cycles of nature, such as

8. The Official Web Site Of The Center For Archaeoastronomy And ISAAC
archaeoastronomy The Official Web Site of the Center for archaeoastronomy and ISAAC.
http://terpconnect.umd.edu/~tlaloc/archastro/
Center for Archaeoastronomy Main Page NEWS Find Out More What is Archaeoastronomy? More About the Center for Archaeoastronomy More About ISAAC Publications of the Center ... Lost Codex Used Book Sale Outside Links Archaeoastronomy Archaeology Astronomy History of Science ... Museums WELCOME
This is the official website of the Center for Archaeoastronomy founded at the University of Maryland. Until recently we also hosted the web pages of ISAAC here
From 1977 until 2005 the Center published a peer-reviewed journal, called Archaeoastronomy: the journal of Astronomy in Culture . This is currently published on behalf of the Center and ISAAC by the University of Texas Press. For several years, the Center also published the , essays from which are available to read on this website.
The Center continues to publish peer-reviewed books and conference proceedings, most recently with another of its professional partners, Ocarina Books ISAAC adopts the Oxford International Symposia on Archaeoastronomy... More... Last Update: 04 July, 2008 Lost Codex Used Book Sale Rare and hard to find books on archaeoastronomy and related subjects
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

9. The Book Of THoTH (Leaves Of Wisdom) - Archaeoastronomy
ImageNewgrange ireland 750px.jpg. archaeoastronomy (also spelled archeoastronomy) is the study of how peoples in the past have understood the phenomena in the sky, how they used
http://www.book-of-thoth.com/thebook/index.php/Archaeoastronomy
Home Forums Leaves of Wisdom Daily News Welcome to "The Leaves Of Wisdom"
Archaeoastronomy
From The Book of THoTH (Leaves of Wisdom)
Image:Newgrange ireland 750px.jpg Archaeoastronomy (also spelled archeoastronomy ) is the study of how peoples in the past "have understood the phenomena in the sky, how they used phenomena in the sky and what role the sky played in their cultures not the study of ancient astronomy ethnoastronomy , the anthropological study of skywatching in contemporary societies. Archaeoastronomy is also closely associated with historical astronomy, the use of historical records of heavenly events to answer astronomical problems and the history of astronomy, which uses written records to evaluate past astronomical traditions. "...[A] field with academic work of high quality at one end but uncontrolled speculation bordering on lunacy at the other."
Contents

10. Archaeoastronomy Pinpoints Equinox, Solstice And Cross Quarter Moments Throughou
Overview of archaeoastronomy. Includes maps, almanacs and video archive.
http://www.archaeoastronomy.com/
Archaeoastronomy Spotlights the Dawn of Human History documentary
US Naval Obs.

Big Bear Solar O.

Don't Fear the 2012 Reaper!
Celebrated archaeoastronomy author Martin Brennan assures a Winter Solstice audience Mayan inscriptions do NOT forecast Earth's last days. What will Hollywood do? Please see our new ALMANACS now extending through 2020.
Blessings of summer's sun!
Old News DVD

my.onter.net/today.html
2010 seasonal cusps in GMT, Greenwich Mean Time, for Northern Hemisphere
Earth's annual orbit is The Master Clock because the common yardstick of our lives is the year . Years are divided by the seasons just as calendars are segmented by months. Mechanical and digital timepieces measure intervals that split into hours, minutes and seconds each spin of our planet on its axis. Yet, it is the earth's regular, rhythmic loop around the sun that standardizes our timeframe of reference, regardless of geographic distances separating us from our acquaintances or generational distances separating us from our ancestors.
Our planet moves around the sun in an elliptical circuit deviating less than a second from one year to the next. Together we proceed through 8 significant, yet invisible, thresholds within each orbit. These spatial milestones mark the beginning, midpoint and end of each of our seasons.

11. Archaeoastronomy Dynamically Counts Down The Days, Hours And Minutes Until Equin
countdown clocks to equinoxes, solstices and cross quarter moments within the next 12 months
http://www.archaeoastronomy.com/countdowns.shtml

12. Archaeoastronomy - Definition And More From The Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary
Definition of word from the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary with audio pronunciations, thesaurus, Word of the Day, and word games.
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/archaeoastronomy

13. HTML REDIRECT
A comprehensive introduction to archaeoastronomy including a look at various people groups and case studies of sites.
http://library.thinkquest.org/C0118421

14. Archaeoastronomy - Crystalinks
archaeoastronomy. archaeoastronomy is the study and interpretation of solar, lunar and stellar alignments found at ancient monuments such as pyramids, towers, ground lines such as
http://www.crystalinks.com/archaeoastronomy.html
Archaeoastronomy
Archaeoastronomy is the study and interpretation of solar, lunar and stellar alignments found at ancient monuments such as pyramids, towers, ground lines such as the Nazca Lines in Peru, and megalithic sites Stonehenge, Carnac, Newgrange, etc. These monuments are on major planetary grid points. Archaeoastronomy uses celestial objects
to mark time, much like calendars do. Archaeoastronomy investigates how the ancients applied astronomy in their lives, as well as in their art and architecture. The study of Archaeoastronomy is a cross disciplinary approach which examines the mythology, religion and world views of prehistoric and ancient civilizations through the means of their astronomical practices. It is the study of the study of contemporary native astronomies. In examining the observations of such peoples, it is possible to gain a certain insight into the ways in which they constructed their own universes and therefore provide a more holistic understanding of the means and motivations of the culture as a whole. The astronomical inquiry of the ancients must be looked upon as a mechanism of observation and prediction which closely tied them to their environments, depending upon various cultural, religious and mythological bases for validation in the process.

15. Archaeoastronomy | The Past & The Sky - Time's Nemesis :: Book
Time's Nemesis Book Original work of fiction Readers have to say 02-03-2010 Lucie Jennings I just finished the Third part of your book and realized how little I know about
http://www.timesnemesis.com/archaeoastronomy.php
HOME CONTACT Monday November 01, 2010 - 08:41 PM (EST) What if the destruction of the world did come in cycles? My Arguments... EMP: Silent and Invisible Long period space debris Sea Peoples: The use of red ochre Stone Henge and the Miami Circle ... PDF Docs Readers have to say... Lucie Jennings
I just finished the Third part of your book and realized how little I know about the history of the Americas and in particular - impacts. Hope we are not in line for a repeat... Julio Guterez
I could not put it down. Several days of late nights and a weekend. The skies will never look quite the same at night. Lisa Roberts
I just finished your book. What a ride. It's real enough to be scary. I wonder what NASA has to say? J. Floram
Thoroughly enjoyed the first half... can't wait to get back on the plane to finish. It's really beginning to get intense, thanks. Information Find more to read...
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NEW ADDITIONS Space/NEO Tools Archaeoastronomy The Impact Record Ocean Impacts? ... Assorted YouTube Videos
Archaeoastronomy
The term archaeoastronomy was first used to survey Megalithic constructs in the British Isles, at sites like Stone Henge and Auglish in County Londonderry, in an attempt to find statistical patterns It has been proposed that Maya sites such as the Caracol at Chichinetza and Uxmal in Mexico were built in accordance with astronomical alignments.

16. Archaeoastronomy
Academic journal for history of astronomy and archaeoastronomy. archaeoastronomy From 2003 archaeoastronomy was no longer published as a separate journal but was
http://www.shpltd.co.uk/aa.html
HOME HISTORY OF SCIENCE HISTORY OF ASTRONOMY BOOKS ... CONTACT ARCHAEOASTRONOMY
From 2003 Archaeoastronomy was no longer published as a separate journal but was
incorporated into enlarged issues of Journal for the History of Astronomy
These are the contents pages for issues.published 1997-2001
For a list of all articles published up to 1999 CLICK HERE No. 27 (2002) Archaeoastronomy in the Sahara: The Tombs of the Garamantes at Wadi el Agial, Fezzan, Libya
Orientations of Dolmens North of the Eastern Pyrenees
RICHARD IUND
GERARDO ALDANA Orientations of Dolmens of West-Central France MICHAEL HOSKIN and GAIL HIGGINBOTTOM
On the Orientations of the Nine Tholos Tombs at Mycenae AMANDA-ALICE MARAVELIA On the Astronomical Orientation of the Square Talayots of Mallorca
Studies in Iberian Archaeoastronomy: (9) An Overview MICHAEL HOSKIN Notes on Contributors Index to Archaeoastronomy, no. 27
No. 26 (2001) On the Orientation of Old Kingdom Egyptian Pyramids JUAN ANTONIO BELMONTE A Method for Dating Venus Almanacs in the Borgia Codex VICTORIA R. BRICKER

17. ArchaeoAstronomy - An Interview With David Dearborn
Interview with David Dearnorn, a specialist in Peruvian Astronomy.
http://archaeology.about.com/cs/archaeoastronomy/a/dearborn.htm
zWASL=1;zGRH=1 zJs=10 zJs=11 zJs=12 zJs=13 zc(5,'jsc',zJs,9999999,'') zDO=0
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    By K. Kris Hirst , About.com Guide
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    Caracol (The Observatory), Chichen Itza, Mexico Jim Gateley (c) 2006 zSB(3,3) David S. P. Dearborn is an astrophysicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory , and co-editor of Archaeoastronomy: A Journal for Astronomy in Culture as well as . In addition, he is a founding member of ISAAC (the International Society for Archaeoastronomy and Astronomy in Culture ), an organization promoting a professional standard in this interdisciplinary study that all too often suffers from spectacular claims involving more enthusiasm than evidence. For more than 20 years, Dr. Dearborn has worked in collaboration with archaeologists to study the Inca and their uses of astronomy. In this interview from 1997, he and I discussed his work and the underpinnings of solid archaeoastronomical research. Why did people study astronomy?

    18. Archaeoastronomy-Science Tracer Bullet
    archaeoastronomy. Science Tracer Bullets Research Guides from the Library of Congress, Science Reference Services.
    http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/tracer-bullets/archaeoastronomytb.html
    The Library of Congress Researchers Home Tracer Bullets Find in Science Tracer Bullets Science Reference Pages Researchers Web Pages All Library of Congress Pages
    Archaeoastronomy
    Tracer Bullet 08-7
    The Antikythera Mechanism
    Now thought to be a mechanical computer, the Antikythera Mechanism was discovered at the bottom of the sea aboard an ancient Greek ship.
    Info: NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day Web site.
    Photo: Wikipedia GNU Free Documentation License.
    SCOPE Many prehistoric and ancient civilizations have left evidence of interest in astronomy but not all have left written records. Some of the archaeological evidence exists in the form of large architectural structures and monuments, some in the form of intricate diagrams and carvings. While historians of astronomy focus on the technical mathematical astronomy texts of the past, the written records, archaeoastronomers emphasize other cultural expressions in tombs, iconography, ritual, ceremony, and agricultural patterns. http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/tracer-bullets/tbs.html

    19. Archaeoastronomy
    Armchair archaeoastronomy. Wayne Campbell
    http://hila.webcentre.ca/projects/chankillo/
    Armchair Archaeoastronomy Wayne Campbell Photograph Andrew Dunn Prehistoric stone structures, created by early astronomers, plotted the sun's motion against the horizon.
    These structures registered the ominous shortening of daylight as winter approached. At Stonehenge, pictured above, Druid priests used the carefully placed stones to follow the sun's journey.
    As the day's shortened, elaborate ceremonies appealed to the gods to stop the sun and lengthen the days.
    Every year the ceremonies worked, the sun paused for a few days and then began moving back north.
    Fortunately that is still true today, every year around December 21, the sun stops its southward journey
    the amount of daylight increases, temperatures moderate and spring arrives. We know that this phenomenon,
    the winter solstice, is the result of a tilted earth, orbiting the sun. A similar event occurs around June 21.
    At summer solstice, the sun pauses its northward motion and begins its journey south towards the winter solstice. To avoid confusion with summer and winter in the two hemispheres it is easier to refer to the two solstices as
    June solstice and December solstice Studying these ancient observatories and the people who created them is called archaeoastromony.

    20. The Official Web Site Of The Center For Archaeoastronomy And ISAAC
    Founded in 1978 at the University of Maryland to advance research, education and public awareness of archaeoastronomy.
    http://terpconnect.umd.edu/~tlaloc/archastro/index.html
    Center for Archaeoastronomy Main Page NEWS Find Out More What is Archaeoastronomy? More About the Center for Archaeoastronomy More About ISAAC Publications of the Center ... Lost Codex Used Book Sale Outside Links Archaeoastronomy Archaeology Astronomy History of Science ... Museums WELCOME
    This is the official website of the Center for Archaeoastronomy founded at the University of Maryland. Until recently we also hosted the web pages of ISAAC here
    From 1977 until 2005 the Center published a peer-reviewed journal, called Archaeoastronomy: the journal of Astronomy in Culture . This is currently published on behalf of the Center and ISAAC by the University of Texas Press. For several years, the Center also published the , essays from which are available to read on this website.
    The Center continues to publish peer-reviewed books and conference proceedings, most recently with another of its professional partners, Ocarina Books ISAAC adopts the Oxford International Symposia on Archaeoastronomy... More... Last Update: 04 July, 2008 Lost Codex Used Book Sale Rare and hard to find books on archaeoastronomy and related subjects
    Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

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